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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 45: exchange of prisoners and Andersonville. (search)
r supplies of combs, scissors, etc., and to send a train with these articles for the use of the United States prisoners of war held by Hood. And again, Major-General Thomas, commanding Department of the Cumberland, on December 5, 1864, wrote to General Hood, acknowledged the receipt of General Hood's letter of same date, proposing the exchange of prisoners, and declined. General Thomas's assigned reason was: Although I have had quite a large number of prisoners from your army, they have all been sent back North, and are consequently now beyond my control; I am therefore unable to make the exchange proposed by you. Finding, wrote Mr. Davis, that ex limit to his patient loyalty. There was nothing like it. J. B. West, Ex-O. S. Co. B., Second Ky. Cav., C. S. A. Nashville, Tenn. December 14, 1861.-John Hanson Thomas, William Harrison, Charles H. Pitts, and S. Teakle Wallis were, for their opinion's sake, confined in a room darkened with venetian shutters fastened outsi
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 62: leaving Charlotte.—The rumors of surrender. (search)
o'clock P. M., April 22, 1865. Mrs. Davis. Madame: I have the honor, in compliance with my offer, to write from this place. I presume you heard the rumors of yesterday, viz., that an armistice of sixty days had been agreed upon, and General Grant had sent couriers to the different raiding parties to that effect; that commissioners to negotiate terms had been appointed, consisting on our part of Generals Lee, Johnston, and Beauregard, and on the part of the Yankees of Grant, Sherman, and Thomas; also that the French fleet had attacked the Yankee gun-boats at New Orleans, and had taken the city. One passenger said that President Davis left Ninetysix Station by stage for Augusta, Ga.; another that he had an escort of three hundred cavalry, and would come the route by Abbeville. As all the above are reports, I know nothing positive of their reliability. The Newbury train is now one hour and a half behind time. If it arrives in time for the Abbeville train, I will add a postscript
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
e—at his own expense, and prepared to lead them to Virginia, she entirely consenting and assisting. She had a fine house, well furnished, with every comfort and convenience. She left that just as it was, to the care of S. Teakle Willis, John Hanson Thomas, Ross Winans, John C. Brune, and the rest of the Baltimore Delegation in the legislature, which was in Frederick, in session. On May 7, 1861, she went to Chestnut Hill, Va., the residence of a friend, Mrs. Mason, and the next day her hus was nominated, that of the States Rights party, and it was elected without opposition. It was such a delegation as the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangston. The Mayor and the police authorities were indefatigable in their efforts to restore quiet. By authority of a special ordinan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ed. On April 24, a special election was held for members of the Legislature. The Governor had called an extra session, and the seats of Baltimore city were vacant because of the expulsion of the delegation at the session of 1860. Only one ticket was nominated, that of the States Rights party, and it was elected without opposition. It was such a delegation as the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangston. The Mayor and the police authorities were indefatigable in their efforts to restore quiet. By authority of a special ordinance the Mayor prohibited the display of flags of all kinds except on the Federal Government buildings, as they tended to cause excitement. On May 5, General B. F. Butler occupied, with two regiments, the Relay House, and on the 13th he entered Baltim