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Ray, flesh wound, in hand; Lieut. Edgar Miller, slight, in shoulder; John Lawson, in arm; James A. Snell, in arm; Dennis Cussick, finger shot off; John Smith, severe, left eye; William E. Quigley, in head; Lieut. Isadore Potier, in leg. Forty-Sixth Virginia.--Frank Gamble, company A, wounded in leg; Frank Johnson, company A, wounded in leg; Henry Adler, severe fracture, thigh; G. W. Jarvis, flesh wound, in foot; Lieut. Frederick Carter, slight wound, arm; William Nute, slight, in leg; Robert Thomas, company I, slight, in neck; Charles H. Thompson, slight, head; Benjamin Burgess, right knee; David Bishop, right shoulder, with fracture. Thirty-First North-Carolina.--J. W. Wards-worth, in lungs, probably mortal; William H. Werner, right arm. Eighth North-Carolina.--Corporal J. H. Anderson, finger shot off; James W. Haney, flesh wound in thigh; William Sikes, severe, right arm; Edward Russ, severe, in head; Capt. Joseph W. Whitson, slight, in leg; James Snowden, company B, in han
us gallantry. One charge particularly was made under the eye of the commander-in-chief and his staff, and drew forth expressions of the most unqualified applause. Cheatham carried into battle 3,801 officers and men. He lost 1,213 killed and wounded, nearly one-third of the command. Among the killed was noble young John Campbell, acting aide; Colonel Wickliffe and Major Welborn, Seventh Kentucky; Capts. J. B. Freeman and G. G. Persons, and Lieut. Isaac M. Jackson, Sixth Tennessee; Adjt. Robert Thomas, Ninth Tennessee; Capt. E. M. Cheairs, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth regiment, and others not reported. Colonel Pond, commanding brigade, in his report of the battle makes honorable mention of Col. Robert F. Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee. Colonel Looney in his own report states that he was ordered by General Polk to charge a battery and camp on the morning of the 6th, and I ordered the charge, which was promptly and successfully executed as to the camp and battery, and I suppose at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
s, J. B. Gregory, W. M. Lovel, A. L. Mosely, R. Malone, B. F. Patrick, J. J. Purcell, J. P. Stephens, N. Smith, R. A. Johnston, E. A. Morriss, Private W. P. Forbes, A. A. Hayes, A. Y. Hanna, H. L. Luckey, M. Murphy, A. Pierce, Robt. Thomas, A. M. Whiteside, W. A. York, E. H. York, P. J. Jennings, S. J. Whaling, R. H. Cordel, W. H. Cordel, J. A. Cox, A. W. Crowson, D. R. Caldwell, J. L. Darby, W. M. Dobbs, C. A. Devoughn, J. M. Giddons, W. W. Giddons, W. W. Hamilthaddix, John Shaddix, C. T. Shaw, R. H. Cain, R. Barnett, J. M. Cason, J. J. Henderson, J. T. Izell, W. Johnson, J. M. Jarrell, R. E. Lovejoy, W. F. Pemberton, R. Patillo, W. H. B. Selman, Jas. Sebring, P. Sargent, T. Speake, R. Thomas, H. C. Thomas, A. Vickers, H. Whitton, J. W. Wright, A. J. Ashcraft, J. W. Anderson, J. Copeland, W. R. Hardy, G. W. Joiner, Jas. Jones, T. J. May, J. H. Mauldin, J. A. Neal, W. C. Pugh, J. M. Sparks, W. A. Spicer, W. H. Sonley
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
A, First regiment Virginia volunteers; John Poe, private, Company A, First regiment Virginia volunteers; Josiah Heller, Company H, First regiment Virginia volunteers; James H. Barnes, Company E, First regiment Virginia volunteers; Theoderick Nunnally, Company G, First regiment Virginia volunteers; William M. Yates, Company M, First regiment Virginia volunteers; W. H. Britt, Company D, First regiment Virginia volunteers; Charles A. Jones, Company C, First regiment Pennsylvania volunteers; Robert Thomas, Ruggle's battery, United States army; John Rutter, Voltigeur regiment, United States army; Henry J. Richardson, United States navy; James Levar, Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania volunteers; Andrew L. Crouch, First Alabama regiment; Charles J. Jones, Company I, First regiment Virginia volunteers. These veterans were commanded by Captain Scott, first captain of the Richmond Grays, and who volunteered for the Mexican war. There are few of them residents of this city, but among them are
The Secretaryship of Scare. The Hon. Robert Thomas, of Georgia, has tendered to the President his resignation of the Secretaryship of State, and it has been accepted. The President yesterday nominated to Congress the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, for this office, and that body has doubtless confirmed the nomination. Thus that distinguished post has lost the services of one of the ablest men in the Confederacy, only to be filled by another occupant equally as able in intellect and statesmanship. Mr. Toombs was of a temper to prefer the active duties of a soldier, in such a crisis as the present, to the monotony of an office, which, for the present, is little more than nominal; and we are glad to learn that the President has acknowledged his distinguished claims upon the confidence of the country by nominating him as a Brigadier General in the Confederate army. Virginia's position in the Confederacy has been acknowledged by assigning to one of her statesmen the hig
that there was no evidence against him, and May rose to a personal explanation. The House indulged him, but he proceeded to attack the Government. There was deep excitement, and he was compelled to proceed by order, by a vote of the House. Ex-Gov. Thomas, of Maryland, replied most eloquently to his attack, defending the Government. There was great excitement throughout the debate, which lasted three hours. May, Burnett and Vallandigham consulted throughout the debate. Ancona, of Pennsylvania, to-day, joined the ranks of Northern traitors, and tried very unbecomingly to prevent Gov. Thomas, of Md., from replying to May. A bitter feeling against him exists among the Pennsylvania members. The city was intensely excited yesterday and to-day over the war news from Virginia. The wildest reports were flying to-day. The Senate indulged in an exciting debate on the war and slavery. Jim Lane, Powell, Carlile and others participated in it. Bright, of Indiana, wallowed in dou
after eating no meal since Saturday morning. It is believed that no officer, save the lamented Col. Fisher, was killed. A gallant Marylander killed. In the list of the slain in the battle of last Sunday, we regret to see the name of Colonel Thomas, of Maryland, one of the aids to Gen. Johnston. Col. Thomas belonged to a family prominently and honorably identified with the history of Maryland for a century past. He was ardently attached to his native State, and felt keenly her present Col. Thomas belonged to a family prominently and honorably identified with the history of Maryland for a century past. He was ardently attached to his native State, and felt keenly her present humiliation. He has fallen a martyr to the cause of Southern independence. Interesting incident. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express relates the following: One of the most interesting incidents of the battle is presented in the case of Wylie P. Mangum, jr., son of Ex-Senator Mangum, of North Carolina. This young man was attached to Colonel Fisher's Regiment, I believe, and owes the preservation of his life to a copy of the Bible presented to him by his sister.--He had the
honor and degradation. The gallant Colonel soon found the Stars and Bars which the gallant South Carolinians had given to a little boy of the village, and it was raised upon the flag-staff which they had erected at their headquarters in the village, and from which had floated the banner, amid the rolling of the drums and the shouts of our citizens. Col. Terry was accorded the privilege and honor of driving the first nail into our flag which affixed it upon the pole they had raised, Senator Thomas the second honor, and Messrs. Chichester and Griunell the next. I wish I had time to tell you of the outrages they committed, upon entering this place; but let it suffice to say, that almost every house was entered, and the whole property of every description entirely destroyed. The house of our Senator, H. W. Thomas, seemed to be the especial object of their hate. They mounted the fences of his beautiful enclosures, yelling like fiends, and soon entered his house and entirely
in thigh and abdomen; John Ray, flesh wound, in hand; Lt. Edgar Miller, slight, in shoulder; John Lawson, in arm; Jas. A. Snell, in arm; Dennis Cussick, finger shot off; John smith, severe, left eye; Wm. E. Quigley, in head; Lt. Isadore Potier, in leg. Forty sixth Virginia.--Frank Gamble, Co. A, wounded in leg; Frank Johnson, Co. A, wounded in leg; Henry Adler, severe fracture, thigh; G. W. Jarvis, flesh wound, in foot; Lt. Fred. Carter, slight wound, arm; Wm. Nute, slight, in leg; Robert Thomas, Co. I, slight, in neck; Chas. H. Thompson, slight, head; Benj. Burgess, right knee; David Bishop, right shoulder, with fracture. 31st North Carolina.--J. W. Wardsworth, in lungs, probably mortal; Wm. H. Werner, right arm. 8th North Carolina.--Corporal J. H. Anderson, finger shot off; James W. Haney, flesh wound in thigh; William Sikes, severe, right arm; Edward Russ, severe in head; Captain Jos. W. Whitson, slight in leg; James Snowden, Company B, in hand; Martin Etherid
A wagon driver, engaged in taking off a load of muskets, brought from the battle-fields, in front of Thomas's factory, on Monday evening, had the fingers of his left hand blown off by the accidental discharge of one of the pieces, which he was attempting to extricate from the rest.