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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 93. the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
ed the store. Mr. Miller was standing in the hall of his house, which communicates with the store, and with his double-barrelled shot gun he brought both down to find sepulchres in the ashes of his house. We do not learn that they blessed the name of McCausland as their bronzed skin blistered and withered beneath the flames he had ordered. Mr. Thomas H. Doyle, of Loudon, who had served in Easton's battery, followed the retreating rebels toward Loudon, to capture stragglers. When beyond St Thomas he caught Captain Cochran, Quartermaster of Eleventh Virginia cavalry, and as he recognized him as one who had participated in the destruction of Chambersburg, he gave him just fifteen minutes to live. Cochran was armed with sword and pistols, but he was taken so suddenly by Mr. Doyle that he had no chance to use them. He begged piteously for his life, but Mr. Doyle was inexorable — the foe who burns and robs must die, and he so informed him peremptorily. At the very second he shot the
d's (Pennsylvania Reserves), on his left. Moving rapidly up across an open space of six or eight hundred yards, Griffin took position in the woods, where a heavy skirmish line was soon met. At first the only rebel troops in the neighborhood consisted of McGowan's brigade, of Wilcox's division (Hill's corps), under command of Colonel Brown, of the Fourteenth South Carolina. But he was presently reinforced by the other three brigades of Wilcox's division — namely, those of Scales, Gordon and Thomas; while Heath's division joined on to the right of Wilcox, and prisoners say that Breckinridge's division afterward came up. The skirmish line which was all our advance at first met, had been easily driven back, and the command had taken up its position in the woods, and had just received orders to intrench, the first preparations for which it was just taking, when Griffin's division, at five fifteen P. M., was furiously assailed by the rebel force above enumerated, which suddenly develope
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
d's (Pennsylvania Reserves), on his left. Moving rapidly up across an open space of six or eight hundred yards, Griffin took position in the woods, where a heavy skirmish line was soon met. At first the only rebel troops in the neighborhood consisted of McGowan's brigade, of Wilcox's division (Hill's corps), under command of Colonel Brown, of the Fourteenth South Carolina. But he was presently reinforced by the other three brigades of Wilcox's division — namely, those of Scales, Gordon and Thomas; while Heath's division joined on to the right of Wilcox, and prisoners say that Breckinridge's division afterward came up. The skirmish line which was all our advance at first met, had been easily driven back, and the command had taken up its position in the woods, and had just received orders to intrench, the first preparations for which it was just taking, when Griffin's division, at five fifteen P. M., was furiously assailed by the rebel force above enumerated, which suddenly develope
ng freedom. Military directors have seized upon all the telegraph lines which traverse America in every direction. The same censorship compels their newspapers to publish only what is favorable to the North and unfavorable to the South. And what is the reason for this? The North speaks to the whole world by the electric wires, while information from the South, when it does come, comes tardily. In fact, the journals and correspondence from the South, which reach us by way of Havana and St Thomas, are sometimes five weeks behind hand, and thus lose all interest. The North proclaims martial law with all its severities; it suppresses every independent voice; it threatens the suspected with death. In presence of such despotism the English press has not been able to remain silent. In the midst of such a struggle, between such desperate opponents, who dare say that a spontaneous or likely pacification is possible? Peace can only come from without, and the word ("Mediation")