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The Daily Dispatch: November 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 4 Browse Search
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.--He resigned his position as Inspector General of the State of New York, and accepted the Colonelcy of the Eighteenth. He was in his thirtieth year, and a son of Professor Jackson of Union College. Return of Secretary Cameron and Adjutant General Thomas. Secretary Cameron and Adjutant General Thomas returned to-day from their tour of inspection of the Northern forts and arsenal. Consul of the Grand Luchy of Saxe Weimer. Frederick Kune has been recognized by the President asAdjutant General Thomas returned to-day from their tour of inspection of the Northern forts and arsenal. Consul of the Grand Luchy of Saxe Weimer. Frederick Kune has been recognized by the President as Consul of the Grand Duchy of Saxe Weimer for the States of New York. Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. News from Mexico. A gentleman occupying a high position in Mexico has just arrived here with important information which he has laid before the Government from the west coast of Mexico and Sonora. If appears that the whole west coast is greatly excited at the contemplated intervention of England, France, and Spain in their affairs, and they
Still Later from the North. from Fortress Monroe--affairs in Missouri--news from Washington--Colonel Zarvona Thomas, &c., &c. From Baltimore papers of the 13th instant we extract the following interesting and latest intelligence from or eighteen or twenty years past he had been a principal draughtsman in the General Land Office in this city. Col. Zarvona Thomas. The Baltimore Clipper, of the 13th instant, has the following paragraph in reference to Col. Thomas, of the sCol. Thomas, of the steamer St. Nicholas notoriety: Thomas, the "French lady," since his incarceration at Fort McHenry, has lost his reason, and become crazy. At times he will with a lead pencil adorn the walls of his room with drawings representing flowers, and wThomas, the "French lady," since his incarceration at Fort McHenry, has lost his reason, and become crazy. At times he will with a lead pencil adorn the walls of his room with drawings representing flowers, and with a watering-pot will saturate his creations with water. When not in a mood for horticulture, he will collect a number of matches, and, dividing them, will stick them into cracks in the floor, tables, chairs, &c.--These he will arrange into regime