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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 110 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 93 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 84 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 76 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 73 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 53 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 46 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 44 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Thomas or search for Thomas in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
each. Their first efforts were to rally the stragglers and, by example, to encourage the whole line. Both were veterans at such work. Johnston took the colors of the 4th Ala. and established it in the line of battle. His ordnance officer, Col. Thomas, was placed in command of a battalion formed of fragments of all commands. Thomas was killed while leading them through the day. Beauregard had his horse killed under him. When the line of battle seemed well established, it was agreed that itThomas was killed while leading them through the day. Beauregard had his horse killed under him. When the line of battle seemed well established, it was agreed that its immediate conduct should be left to Beauregard, and that Johnston should take his position at the Lewis house, a short distance in the rear, whence he could control the movements of all forces, and direct the reenforcements as they approached the field. Two incomplete regiments of Cocke's brigade, the 8th Va., of seven companies, and the 49th, of three companies, were brought from Ball's Ford. Ewell's brigade was sent for from Union Mills. Orders to hasten were sent the two regiments unde
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
convexity toward the enemy. Desperate but unavailing attempts were made to force the enemy's positions. The 14th S. C., Col. McGowan (having hurried up from picket duty on the other side of the Chickahominy, and arriving in the thickest of the fight), on the extreme left, made several daring charges. The 16th N. C., Col. McElroy, and 22d, Lt.-Col. Gray, at one time carried the crest of the hill, and were in the enemy's camp, but were driven back by overwhelming numbers. The 35th Ga., Col. Thomas, also drove through the enemy's line like a wedge, but it was all of no avail. Gregg and Branch fought with varying success, Gregg having before him the vaunted Zouaves and Sykes's regulars. Pender's brigade was suffering heavily, but stubbornly held its own. Field and Archer met a withering storm of bullets, but pressed on to within a short distance of the enemy's works, but the storm was too fierce for such a handful of men. They recoiled and were again pressed to the charge, but with
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
d only skirmish fire, and they easily entered. But when they approached the Confederate line of battle and met its fire, the conflict was short and the Federals retreated, Gregg's brigade following them. Milroy's brigade came to their help, but Thomas's brigade came to Gregg's, and the Federals were driven completely through the wood and pursued by the Confederate fire as they retreated across the fields. This much was over by 10.30 A. M. The best of Pope's opportunity would be lost by 1 P.e open ground on Jackson's left. The other two divisions came through the wood, and this time portions of the assaulting column actually crossed the railroad line, and fierce hand-to-hand fighting ensued, the brunt of it falling upon Field's and Thomas's brigades. Field was severely wounded; but Pender's brigade, from Hill's third line, joining in the melee, the Federals were again borne back, and again pursued, not only through the wood, but out into the open ground beyond, where Pender incau
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
S 1st Corps Longstreet'sMcLawsKershaw, Semmes, Cobb, Barksdale5 Anderson, R. H.Wilcox, Armistead, Mahone, Pryor, Featherstone, Wright4 Jones, D. R.Toombs, Drayton, Garnett, Kemper, Jenkins, Anderson, G. T.4 Walker, J. G.Walker, J. G. Ransom2 EvansEvans, Hood, Law3 Reserve ArtilleryWashington Artillery, Lee's Battalion10 Total 1st Corps5 Divisions21 Brigades, 28 Batteries, 112 Guns28 2d Corps Jackson'sEwellLawton, Trimble, Early, Hays7 Hill, A. P.Branch, Archer, Gregg, Pender, Field, Thomas7 JacksonWinder, Jones, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPendleton's Reserve, 58 Guns12 CavalryStuartHampton, Lee F., Robertson, 14 Guns3 Aggregate2 Corps, 10 Divisions43 Brigades, 284 guns, 55,000 Men67 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTS. 1st CorpsKingPhelps, Doubleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
out sunrise on the 17th. A. P. Hill's division was detained in Harper's Ferry until the morning of the 17th. He marched at 7.30 A. M. with five brigades, leaving Thomas's to look after the captured property, to remove which Jackson had requested Lee to send his chief quartermaster and ordnance officer. Thus it happened that, w9194 Hays452892336 Total1961106401342 A. P. Hill's Div. Branch241544182 Archer22161183 Gregg381882228 Pender12103115 Field Field's not engaged. Thomas Thomas's brigade absent. Total966066708 J. R. Jones's Div. Winder117788 Johnson, B. T. Johnson made no brigade report, but losses have been estimated Thomas's brigade absent. Total966066708 J. R. Jones's Div. Winder117788 Johnson, B. T. Johnson made no brigade report, but losses have been estimated to conform to the division report.36116152 Taliaferro41132173 Starke8118917287 Total16951417700 D. H. Hill's Div. Ripley110506124740 Garland46210187443 Rodes111289225625 Anderson64299202565 Colquitt129518184831 Hill's Art430337 Total46418529253241 Reserve Artillery347 Cavalry1045661 Agg. Jackson's Corps9384
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
n's, Ramseur's H. P. Jones's Battalion, 5 Batteries, 22 Guns6,944 A. P. Hill'sField's, Gregg's, Thomas's, Lane's, Archer's, Pender's Walker's Battalion, 7 Batteries, 28 Guns11,554 Taliaferro'sPaxton brigade was supporting the 12 and 21 guns before referred to. Behind Lane, about 400 yards, was Thomas's brigade. The remaining brigade of the division, Gregg's, was placed in the military road oppots right flank turned by Meade's through the unoccupied gap, was forced back in the woods, until Thomas's brigade came to its support. This soon restored the line. Of Meade's three brigades, the leaoke's brigade was also sent to the assistance of Archer, and Early's brigade to support Lane and Thomas. The whole Federal advance was driven from the woods and pursued out into the plain. The troops of Archer, Lane, and Thomas, or portions of them, joined in the counter-stroke, and the whole of both Meade's and Gibbon's divisions were involved and carried along with the retreat. But there was
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
ivisions17,6499 Brigades1872 2D corps, Jackson's A. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles on the flank and captured a regiment, the 23d Ga. The two rear brigades, under Thomas and Archer, with Brown's battalion of artillery, were halted for an hour in obspike. Lane, McGowan, and Heth were coming in column down the pike. Archer and Thomas were following, but some miles behind. Jackson had made his play so far with fduring the whole afternoon. So it happened that five of Jackson's 15 brigades (Thomas, Archer, Paxton, Colquitt and Ramseur) were missing from his line of battle durit was also forced to fall back. On the left of the Plank road, the advance of Thomas beyond the enemy's first line met both a stronger second line and a flank attacReport of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wounded and missing.464027455 Ga. Thomas's Brig.21156177 N. C. Lane's Brig.161626121908 Ala. Archer's Brig.4430516365
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
nry, Walton, Alexander2184 Totals21,231 11 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 Totals21,961 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 3D corps. A. P. Hill Anderson7,440Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry, Posey Heth7,500Pettigrew, Brockenbrough, Archer, Davis Pender6,800Perrin, Lane, Thomas, Scales Arty. Battns.1,000Lane, Garnett, Poague, McIntosh, Pegram2080 Totals22,740 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2080 65,932 3 Corps, 9 Divisions, 37 Brigades, 15 Battns. Arty.62248 Stuart Cavalry10,292 Hampton, Robertson, Jones, F. Lee, Jenkins, W. H. F. Lee Imboden 1 Battn. Arty.624 Totals10,292 1 Division, 7 Brigades624 Aggregate76,22413 Corps, 10 Divisions, 44 Brigades, L6 Battns. Arty.68272 The figures given are the returns of the Officers and men present for duty on May 31
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
20 Doles2412431179 Ramseur2312232177 O'Neal73430193696 Carter's Arty.6352465 Rodes's Div.4211,7287042,853 Brown's Arty.31922 Nelson's Arty. Reserve Arty.31922 2d Corps8093,8231,3055,937 Wilcox51469257777 Mahone85539102 Wright4095333668 Perry33217205455 Posey127183 Lane's Arty.321630 Anderson's Div.1471,1288402,115 Pettigrew1909151,105 Brockenbrough251 123148 Archer16144517677 Davis180717897 Garnett's Arty.51722 Heth's Div.4111,9055342,850 Perrin100477577 Lane41348389 Thomas16136152 Scales102323110535 Poague's Arty.224632 Pender's Div.2621,3121161,690 McIntosh's Arty.72532 Pegram's Arty.1037148 Reserve Arty.176216,735 3d Corps8374,4071,4916,735 Confederate casualties. Gettysburg. Approximate by brigades COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Hampton17581691 Lee, F.5162950 Lee, W. H. F.2261341 Jones1240658 Jenkins's Arty. Total Cavalry3614064240 Aggregate2,59212,7095,15020,451 Livermore's Estimate3,90318,7355,42528,063 Federal casualties. Gett
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
ERIES 14thBairdScribner, Starkweather, King3 ThomasNegleyBeatty, Stanley, Sirwell3 Pres. 22,758Brght have crushed, in McLemore's Cove, parts of Thomas's and McCook's corps. Orders were issued for , and by only 12 brigades, and was resisted by Thomas with 12 brigades in fortified lines, yet, at 1heridan. About this time another message from Thomas reached Rosecrans that he was heavily pressed,t wing to unite with the left, and move behind Thomas, where a gap of great extent had been opened, t two-thirds of the army, say 30,000 men under Thomas, here held together in a strong position and s of the 14th corps, which had formed a part of Thomas's attack upon the centre in the afternoon, as tack on the Confederate centre was assigned to Thomas, who had been in readiness all the morning, buagg detaching troops from his centre, opposite Thomas, and sending them to reenforce the right opposen men, but the party was captured inside. Col. Thomas of the same regiment was killed in the dit[9 more...]
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