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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 110 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 93 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 84 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 76 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 73 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 53 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 46 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 44 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for Thomas or search for Thomas in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
apparatus, but the Widow Glover, whom he finally made his wife. For forty years all the printing done in the British Colonies in America was done on this press, Stephen Daye being followed by his son Matthew, and he by Samuel Green. We know that the first work printed here was The Freeman's oath, in 1639; and that about a hundred books were thus printed before 1700, this including Eliot's English Bible. It was not till 1674, nearly forty years later, that a press was set up in Boston; and Thomas in his History of printing says that the press of Harvard College was, for a time, as celebrated as the press of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge in England. And not merely were the foundations of the town and of the college thus laid in literature, but the early presidents of Harvard were usually selected, not merely for soundness of doctrine,which was not always their strong point,--but for their scholarship and even supposed literary taste. President Dunster, for instance, was