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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 110 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 93 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 84 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 76 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 73 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 53 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 46 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 44 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Thomas or search for Thomas in all documents.

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ding. --The Grand Division of the Sons of Temperance of North Carolina, at its recent meeting, adopted an able report, announcing its withdrawal from the jurisdiction of the National Division of North America, and declaring a purpose to co-operate with others in the formation of a National Division in the South. We deem it due to the jurisdictions in the Confederate States to say that they have had nothing to do with the old organization (embracing the Northern States) since the fall of 1860. Since that period, all necessary action of a national character has been performed under the direction of our townsman, Col. Thomas J. Evans, who was the highest active officer in the Southern Confederacy when the separation took place. We ask attention to a call for a meeting of the Grand Division in this city, on the 8th of January next, when we hope the attendance will be numerous, and such steps be taken as will bring about a speedy and permanent organization for the Southern States.
runaways and confined in the Bedford jail. The Charleston sufferers. Mr. Thompson of Dinwiddie offered the following resolutions, which were adopted: "Resolved, That the Senate tender their sincere sympathy to the suffering citizens of Charleston in the distressing circumstances to which they are reduced by the recent conflagration which has visited that city; and recognizing them as our brethren, identified with us in interest, united in a common destiny, and engaged in a common cause alike dear to us all-- "Resolved, That the Committee of Finance be instructed to inquire into the expediency of an appropriation for their relief. Senatorial vacancies. Mr. Thomas, of Fairfax, from the Committee on Privileges and Elections, reported a bill to provide for holding elections to fill vacancies in the Senate from the 46th and 50th districts. On motion of Mr. Thompson, the Senate adjourned. [The House proceedings of Saturday are unavoidably omitted.]
on was originally Presbyterian, but probably united both Congregationalists and Presbyterians. In 1734 the latter separated and commenced worship in a new wooden edifice, on the site of the present "Scotch Church." The pulpit has been filled for a period of 175 years, by seventeen pastors, commencing with the Rev. Messrs. Pierpont, Adams, and Cotton, in the latter fifteen years of the 17th century, and followed by the Rev. Stobo, Livingston, Bassett, Parker, Smith, Edmonds, Hutson, Bennett, Thomas, Tenent, Hollingshead, Keith, Palmer, and Post. On the 25th May, 1806. the new building was opened for the first time, with appropriate religious exercises. The new building was circular in form, and 88 feet in diameter. In 1838 the addition of a lofty spire, 182 feet high, added to the appearance of the building. A few years since, the Church was entirely renovated, at an expense of $20,000, rendering it one of the most beautiful and consistently arranged of our city places of w