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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. G. Thomas or search for J. G. Thomas in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
G. Gaillard, J. F. Gilmer, Cormack Hopkins, J. G. Thomas, M. D., C. C. Schley, M. D., Julian Myers, ut fifteen miles from Crittenden's position to Thomas's advance, and the Confederate right was almos mountain roads to pass from McCook's corps to Thomas's, and to crown the opportunity for a swift stroke Thomas's two advance divisions were separated by Lookout Mountain from the rest of his corps. , with full knowledge of the false position of Thomas's two divisions. On the very evening of the dm in his movement against the two divisions of Thomas in McLemore's Cove. Recently I found among mye the enemy's centre, and capture a portion of Thomas's corps of Rosecrans's army, that had advancedication, in regard to the isolated fragment of Thomas's corps then at Davis's Cross-Roads in the Covd concentrated or was concentrating McCook and Thomas's corps, on his left and rear at Alpine, southeized Paducah, Ky.; General W. T. Sherman, General Thomas and General Wm. Nelson, aggregating a forc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
Morel, W. S. Bogart, G. M. Ryals, A. H. Lane, Rufus E. Lester, W. S. Basinger, J. B. Read, M. D., Joel Kennard, A. McC. Duncan, E. P. Alexander, John F. Wheaton, LaFayette McLaws, Henry C. Wayne, George A. Mercer, John Schwarz, W. W. Gordon, Fred. M. Hull, A. A. Winn, H. M. Comer, T. B. Chisholm, W. G. Waller, John Talliaferro, J. D. Johnston, T. S. Wayne, C. L. Chestnut, John Flannery, Daniel Lahey, D. G. Purse, Wm. Duncan, C. W. Anderson, R. G. Gaillard, J. F. Gilmer, Cormack Hopkins, J. G. Thomas, M. D., C. C. Schley, M. D., Julian Myers, E. M. Anderson. The committee had arranged a brilliant reception of General Lee at the depot—an open barouche drawn by four beautiful grays, a turnout of the military, etc.—but the cavalry flanked them by arriving some hours ahead of the appointed time and quietly finding at the Pulaski House the elegant rooms which the Messrs. Goodsell had set apart as our quarters. But the committee and other friends were not long in ascertaining that we h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
It was about fifteen miles from Crittenden's position to Thomas's advance, and the Confederate right was almost interposedarching over mountain roads to pass from McCook's corps to Thomas's, and to crown the opportunity for a swift stroke Thomas'Thomas's two advance divisions were separated by Lookout Mountain from the rest of his corps. This was the brilliant opportunityis eyes open, with full knowledge of the false position of Thomas's two divisions. On the very evening of the day they reacfluencing him in his movement against the two divisions of Thomas in McLemore's Cove. Recently I found among my papers the you to strike the enemy's centre, and capture a portion of Thomas's corps of Rosecrans's army, that had advanced into McLemogthy communication, in regard to the isolated fragment of Thomas's corps then at Davis's Cross-Roads in the Cove, between 9the enemy had concentrated or was concentrating McCook and Thomas's corps, on his left and rear at Alpine, southwest of Lafa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
wing of the army at Columbus, Ky. General Johnston made his headquarters at Bowling Green, the centre of his extended command, stretching from Cumberland Gap along the Barren river, to the Mississippi, on the left. General Johnston had an available force to defend this entire line of only about 19,000 men. There was opposed to him, under the ablest leaders of the Union, General Anderson, his early friend at West Point; General Grant, who had seized Paducah, Ky.; General W. T. Sherman, General Thomas and General Wm. Nelson, aggregating a force of 34,000 volunteers. General Johnston, by exaggerating his force and a skillful disposition of it, held against fearful odds this extended line for months, until the fall of Forts Donelson and Henry necessitated the removal of his army further south to protect the valley of the Mississippi. Bowling Green had to be evacuated and Nashville left unprotected— Nashville and the State of Tennessee. It was at this time that General Johnston was s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
igade, and listening to speeches from old comrades. After this they assembled at the stand, where, after prayer by Rev. (General) Gano, there followed an address by General Gano, recalling some deeply interesting incidents of camp and march and battle-field, which he has promised to write out for our Papers. Major Henry T. Stanton read a very sweet poem on Lee, which we had hoped to publish in this issue, but it has been unfortunately crowded out, as is also an admirable paper read by Major Thomas W Bullit, of Louisville, in which he related incidents confirming the tender of the supreme command of the United States Army to General Lee—the high estimate which General Scott had of the best soldier he ever saw. and General Lee's freedom from nepotism. These, together with an admirable paper read by Mr. Henry L. Stone, and a deeply interesting and very valuable sketch of the Ohio raid, read by Captain Leland Hathaway, will appear in due season in our Papers. Colonel J. W. Bowles, of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
o as to prevent him from sending off any more troops. In the meanwhile Thomas's corps, One division of one brigade of Thomas's corps, about 8,000 men. (General Bragg's letter to me dated February 8th, 1873.) while in the act of passing one of thefile. McLemore's Cove. To return for a moment to McLemore's Cove, General Bragg had sent General Hindman to attack Thomas in flank and rear, whilst he would move up the mountain in force from Lafayette and attack in front; § the attack in fronack to the Ridge; and Hooker, on the night of the 25th of November, occupied it and placed himself in communication with Thomas's right. In that engagement the enemy's batteries at Moccasin Bend, just across from the point, not only threw grape a Bragg's left, and thus forced the latter to reinforce his left still more at the hazard of his centre. It was then that Thomas advanced the Army of the Cumberland, and succeeded in taking the rifle-pits at the base of the ridge, and rushing headlon