Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for L. Thomas or search for L. Thomas in all documents.

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Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received, of the affair at Bayou Bourbeaux, of November third, 1863. Disparaging remarks having appeared in a large part of the public newspapers, upon the management of this affair, by Major-General Washburn, I beg to call attention to the report of that officer, to that of General Burbridge, Colonel Guppy, Twenty-third Wisconsin volunteers, and the order of march of Major-General Franklin, by which it will be seen that General Washburne was at his prescribed post, with his command, on the morning of the attack, and that it was owing to his zeal and diligence that the rear-guard, when attacked, were reinforced promptly, and the enemy driven away discomfited. L
ve served their country with fidelity and credit to themselves throughout these events, and have received my personal thanks. Inclosed you will please find a map of that part of the battle-field of Chattanooga, fought over by the troops under my command, surveyed and drawn by Captain Jenny, of my staff. I have the honor to be, W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding. Report of Major-General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, Dec. 1, 1863. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: General: The following operations of the army of the Cumberland, since October thirty-first, are respectfully submitted to the General-in-Chief: As soon as communications with Bridgeport had been made secure, and the question of supplying the army at this point rendered certain, preparations were at once commenced for driving the enemy from his position in our immediate front — on Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge — and if p
Doc. 34.-army of the Cumberland. Operations in Jan. And Feb. 1864. General Thomas's report. headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, March 10, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: General: I have the honor to report the operations of my command for the months of January and February, 1864, as follows: From the first until as late as the twentieth of January, no movements of any consequence took place. Small scouting-parBrigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: General: I have the honor to report the operations of my command for the months of January and February, 1864, as follows: From the first until as late as the twentieth of January, no movements of any consequence took place. Small scouting-parties, of both cavalry and infantry, were sent out from time to time, to watch the movements of the enemy, but failed to find him in any considerable force in our immediate front. Information gained through scouts and deserters, placed Johnston's army at Dalton and vicinity, occupying the same position he had taken up after the rebel army had fallen back from Mission Ridge, November twenty-sixth, 1863, and showing no disposition as yet to assume the offensive. Desertions from the enemy still
t with the captured property. This was about three P. M. The General thought it was impossible to get back over the Smoky Mountain, and endeavored to make his way to the Cattaloocha road, on the head of Cosby Creek. He immediately despatched to Thomas (who was the senior officer in command) to send Colonel Henry, with the balance of the command and artillery, by the road around the base of the mountain, to meet him on Cosby. The force with General Vance travelled that night until twelve o'cload in their front blockaded. They then had to lay by until daylight, when they cut out the blockade, and reached Cosby about one P. M.; but, instead of finding Henry there, they found a despatch from him saying that, upon consultation with Colonel L. Thomas, he had concluded the route was impracticable, and would fall back across the Smoky Mountain. So there was General Vance, with the captured property, prisoners, etc., and only about one hundred and seventy-five men. These had not been on t