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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
attack with vigor on Kearny's left, and were again repulsed with heavy loss. The attack continued until some time after night. This attack commenced at four P. M. and was pushed by heavy masses with the utmost determination and vigor. Captain Thompson's battery, directed with great skill, firing double charges, swept them back. The whole open space, two hundred paces wide, was filled with the enemy. Each repulse brought fresh troops. Seeing that the enemy was giving way, I returned the morning. Rebellion Record, vol. XI. part II. p. 107. In his account of the fight, General Kearny wrote,-- At four P. M. the attack commenced on my line with a determination and vigor, and in such masses, as I had never witnessed. Thompson's battery, directed with great skill, literally swept the slightly falling open space with the completest execution, and, mowing them down by ranks, would cause the survivors to momentarily halt; but, almost instantly after, increased masses cam
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
Pryor; 14th Ala., 2d and 8th Fla., 3d Va. Right's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 44th Ala., 3d, 22d, and 48th Ga. Artillery, Maj. John S. Saunders; Donaldsonville (La.) Art. (Maurin's battery), Huger's (Va.) battery, Moormal's (Va.) battery, Thompson's (Grimes's) (Va.) battery. Jones's Division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones:--Toombs's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs, Col. Henry L. Benning; 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes and Major Skidmore Harris; 15th Ga., Col. W. T. Millican; 17th enjamin F. Cook; 13th Mass., Maj. J. Parker Gould; 83d N. Y. (9th Militia), Lieut.-Col. William Atterbury; 11th Pa., Col. Richard Coulter, Capt. David M. Cook. Artillery, 1st Pa. Light, Batt. F, Capt. Ezra Wv. Matthews; Pa. Light, Batt. C, Capt. James Thompson. Third Division, (1) Brig.-Gen. George G. Meade, (2) Brig.-Gen. Truman Seymour:--First Brigade, (1) Brig.-Gen. Truman Seymour, (2) Col. R. Biddle Roberts; 1st Pa. Reserves, Col. R. Biddle Roberts, Capt. William C. Talley; 2d Pa. Reserv
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
. S., Batt. H, Lieut. Chandler P. Eakin, Lieut. Philip D. Mason; 3d U. S., Batts. F and K, Lieut. John G. Turnbull; 4th U. S., Batt. C, Lieut. Evan Thomas; 5th U. S., Batt. C, Lieut. Gulian V. Weir. First Volunteer Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Freeman McGilvery; Mass. Light, 5th Batt. (E), Tenth New York Battery attached. Capt. Charles A. Phillips; Mass. Light, 9th Batt., Capt. John Bigelow, Lieut. Richard S. Milton; N. Y. Light, 15th Batt., Capt. Patrick Hart; Pa. Light, Batts. C and F, Capt. James Thompson. Second Volunteer Brigade, Capt. Elijah D. Taft; 1st Conn. Heavy, Batt. B, Capt. Albert F. Brooker; 1st Conn. Heavy, Batt. M, Not engaged. Capt. Franklin A. Pratt; Conn. Light, 2d Batt., Capt. John W. Sterling; N. Y. Light, 5th Batt., Capt. Elijah D. Taft. Third Volunteer Brigade, Capt. James F. Huntington; N. H. Light, 1st Batt., Capt. Frederick M. Edgell; 1st Ohio Light, Batt. H, Lieut. George W. Norton; 1st Pa. Light, Batts. F and G, Capt. R. Bruce Ricketts; W. Va. Light, Batt.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates should be foremost in crediting him with all that his admirers so justly claim, and ask at
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 79 (search)
sition until our ammunition was exhausted and all hopes of re-enforcements despaired of, so at 10 p. m. when the enemy charged our lines we fell back, firing our last round of ammunition upon the advancing foe. Arriving at the point where our lines had been formed in the afternoon, we joined the rest of the brigade, and went into bivouac some half a mile to the right about midnight. Our casualties in this engagement embraced Capt. Samuel W. McCulloch, Company D, mortally wounded; Second Lieut. James Thompson, Company F, severely wounded; 5 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded; 26 enlisted men wounded; 26 enlisted men missing in action, making an aggregate loss of 59 out of about 200 engaged. On the morning of the 31st we advanced our lines about a half a mile, and began to throw up breast-works; while thus engaged the enemy made a spirited assault upon our whole line, but the reserves of the skirmish line checked their advance and we completed our works. The morning of Sunday, Ju
hell, commanding brigades, were also conspicuous for their bravery and activity. They managed their troops well, and contributed much to our success during the day Colonel Daniel C. McCook, commanding Second brigade, Second division, properly and promptly carried out all orders and instructions I gave him. Although his brigade was not engaged in the battle, it held a very important position, protecting the rear of those who were fighting. The aid and assistance rendered me by Colonel James Thompson, my Chief of Artillery, were timely and of great importance. His well-known ability and former experience rendered him a most efficient officer on the field. The commanding officers of all my regiments, with but one exception, and of all my batteries, behaved nobly. Below I give a list of those most conspicuous for efficiency and bravery, and deserving special mention: Colonel Champion, Ninety-sixth Illinois; Colonel Moon, One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois; Colonel La Favour
and about seven hundred and fifty prisoners. Among the rebel slain and left were Colonel Ruffin of the First, and Colonel Thompson of the Fifth North-Carolina cavalry. The battle-flags captured were that of the Twenty-sixth North-Carolina infantrpower which made him a Major-General. The victory was signal and complete. I am reliably informed that the rebel Colonel Thompson stated that General Lee's object was to head us off before reaching Centreville, and supposed that when he made the ennsylvania reserves, was wounded in head and foot. Among the rebels slain were Colonel Ruffin, of the First, and Colonel Thompson, of the Fifth North-Carolina cavalry. The battle-flags captured belonged to the Twenty-eighth and Twenty-sixth Nortur forces are now safely and securely posted, our trains all parked, and the army in excellent spirits. The rebel Colonel Thompson states that it was General Lee's object to head us off before reaching Centreville, and supposed when he made the at
er cup of the milk of human kindness, and conclude to come to our relief, ordered a charge. Colonel Butler, with companies H, Captain Souper; G, Lieutenant Armstrong; D, Sergeant Bronson, dashed forward, completely routed the enemy and retook the ground. Charge after charge was made upon the several companies forming our line of battle, but each time the rebels were handsomely repulsed. For four miles Colonel Graham contested every foot of the ground back to the brigade. Major Lyle, Captain Thompson, and Captain Loomis, the commanders of the several battalions, were all active in the performance of every duty devolving upon them. The heavy booming of the cannon and the sharp firing of the musketry told to all within hearing that a fearful contest was being waged. Anxious hearts were beating in the breasts of the brave five hundred as they slowly gave way to this large force; hopes would rise and fall, as if tossed about on ocean's waves. At times it seemed as though we were comp
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
m, 10==118. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Col. Orlando M. Poe; 3d Mich., Col. Stephen G. Champlin; 5th Mich., Col. Henry D. Terry; 37th N. Y., Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 69; w, 223; m, 7==299. Artillery, Capt. James Thompson: B, 1st N. J., Capt. John E. Beam; E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Fourth Army Corps, Brigadier-General Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 5th U. S., Major Joseph H. Whittlesey. first division, BriCapt. James Thompson. Fourth Army Corps, Brigadier-General Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 5th U. S., Major Joseph H. Whittlesey. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Col. Julius W. Adams: 65th N. Y. (1st U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieut.-Col. Nelson Cross; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas H. Neill; 31st Pa., Col. David H. Williams; 61st Pa., Col. Oliver H. Rippey. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck: 55th N. Y., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand; 62d N. Y., Col. John L. Riker; 93d Pa., Col. James M. McCarter; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley. Brigade
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
W. Egan; 101st N. Y., Col. Enrico Fardella. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 53; m, 185==248. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Maj. Louis Dillman, Capt. William Humphrey; 3d Mich., Lieut.-Col. Ambrose A. Stevens; Maj. Byron R. Pierce; 5th Mich., Maj. John D. Fairbanks (mn w), Capt. Judson S. Farrer; 1st N. Y., Col. Garrett Dyckman; 37th N. Y., Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 225, m, 176 == 429. Artillery: E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 16; m, 5==23. reserve artillery, Capt. Gustavus A. De Russy: 6th N. Y., Capt. Walter M. Bramhall; 2d N. J., Capt. John E. Beam (k), Lieut. John B. Monroe; K, 4th U. S., Lieut. Francis W. Seeley. Loss: k, 1; w, 3; m, 1 == 5. Fourth Corps, Brig.-Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 8th Pa., Col. David McM. Gregg. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albion P. Howe: 55th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Louis Thourot; 62d N. Y., Col. D
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