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. Long's brigade, being in the rear, were not able to participate generally in the charge; but they fought, when they had an opportunity, like Spartans. The General, who learned of his promotion on his return, was, I regret to say, wounded severely in the leg and arm while gallantly leading the brigade. Colonel Minty, whose soldierly form was conspicuous in the charge, urging the men to follow him, had his horse shot under him, an orderly was shot by his side. and his Inspector, Captain Thompson, captured. General Kilpatrick is loud in his praise of Long and Minty, and the nameless heroes who fought by them. Leaving the rebel dead and wounded on the field, preparations were made for the return. The Third division was ordered to move on the McDonough road, the Second division to cover the movement. Before the leading brigade had moved, Pat Cleburne's division of infantry advanced and attacked Long's brigade, which fought splendidly, and although forced to fall back, they d
St. Louis, November 2, 1861. To Brigadier-General Grant: Jeff. Thompson is at Indian ford of the St. Francis river, twenty-five miles be from Cape Girardeau and Bird's Point to assist Carlin in driving Thompson into Arkanas. By order of Major-General Fremont. Chauncey McKeof a rebel force, understood to be three thousand strong, under Jeff. Thompson, now at Indian ford, on the St. Francis river. An expeditionof directions, from this place and Cape Girardeau in pursuit of Jeff. Thompson. This information determined me to attack vigorously his forcemont was sent to Colonel Oglesby, commanding expedition against Jeff. Thompson, and orders to return to Bird's Point by way of Charleston, Missouri. Before these reached him, however, he had learned that Jeff. Thompson had left the place where he was reported to be when the expeditiing Price, or sending a force to cut off the expedition against Jeff. Thompson, the confidence inspired in our troops in the engagement will b
eir works and took seventy prisoners, among them six officers. A very large number of the enemy were killed, among them a colonel; many officers, and three hundred dead were left lying in our front, inside of the line of skirmishers. Crawford lost a considerable number of men. Brigadier-General Ramsay was left on the field and reported killed. Colonel W. H. Kent, of the Sixth regulars, was shot through the hand; Captain Worth, of the Sixth, was also wounded; Colonel Tyrel is killed; Sergeant Thompson, of the Bucktails, who captured the battle-flag of the Fifteenth Georgia, at Gettysburg, was wounded and made prisoner. When the attack was made upon Warren, Hancock was ordered, at eight o'clock last evening, to make a diversion in his favor. The order was vigorously executed; and after a couple of hours' of heavy cannonade was kept up on the rebel position by several batteries and six mortars, this morning finds our line in much the same formation as it had yesterday. The Sixth
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, in the field, near Hanovertown, Va. Tuesday, May 31. (search)
eir works and took seventy prisoners, among them six officers. A very large number of the enemy were killed, among them a colonel; many officers, and three hundred dead were left lying in our front, inside of the line of skirmishers. Crawford lost a considerable number of men. Brigadier-General Ramsay was left on the field and reported killed. Colonel W. H. Kent, of the Sixth regulars, was shot through the hand; Captain Worth, of the Sixth, was also wounded; Colonel Tyrel is killed; Sergeant Thompson, of the Bucktails, who captured the battle-flag of the Fifteenth Georgia, at Gettysburg, was wounded and made prisoner. When the attack was made upon Warren, Hancock was ordered, at eight o'clock last evening, to make a diversion in his favor. The order was vigorously executed; and after a couple of hours' of heavy cannonade was kept up on the rebel position by several batteries and six mortars, this morning finds our line in much the same formation as it had yesterday. The Sixth
ion. My thanks are due all the officers and men for their gallantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Kitchell, commanding Ninety-eighth Illinois volunteers, and Captains Wiley, Wood, and DeLong, One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois volunteers, are deserving of special mention for their promptness and acts of bravery. Captain Wiley with a squad of men captured about twenty prisoners and two pieces of artillery three hundred yards in advance of the line and east of the Plantersville road. Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson and Major L. S. Kilburn, Seventy-second Indiana volunteers, are deserving of credit for their promptness in supporting the battery with that portion of the regiment not on picket. Captain O. F. Bane, Lieutenant H. M. Ashmore, and Lieutenant G. B. Sweet, of Colonel Miller's staff, are entitled to great credit for their promptness in the discharge of their duties and for their courage. Captain W. A. Owens, Provost Marshal, is entitled to credit for his energy and industry in col