hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
y submerged. The easy motion at sea, peculiar to the monitors, was pointed out by several of their commanders. Lieutenant Greene in his report to the Secretary of the Navy, dated on board the Monitor, March 27th, 1862, says with reference to sea-going qualities: During her passage from New York her roll was very easy and slow and not at all deep. She pitched very little and with no strain whatever. Isaac Newton, first assistant-engineer of the monitor. from a medallion portrait by Launt Thompson. At the time of Mr. Newton's death (September 25, 1884) he had been for several years Chief Engineer of the Croton Aqueduct. The plans which have been adopted for the new aqueduct were his, both in the general features and the details.-editors. Captain John Rodgers's report to the Secretary of the Navy, dated on board of the monitor Weehawken, January 22d, 1863, refers specially to the easy motion of his vessel: On Tuesday night, when off Chincoteague shoals, we had a very heavy
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Launt 1833-1894 (search)
Thompson, Launt 1833-1894 Sculptor; born in Abbeyleix, Queen's County, Ireland, Feb. 8, 1833; came to the United States in 1847; studied medicine and later drawing and modelling; and opened a studio in New York in 1858. Among his best-known works are statues of General Sedgwick, Winfield Scott, and Abraham Pierce, and busts of Edwin Booth, Bryant, and General Dix. He was vice-president of the National Academy of Design in 1874. He died in Middletown, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1894.