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my in the thicket, with canister shot, and sent many a poor Hessian to his last account. From another letter, addressed to a gentleman in this city, we glean the following incidents: In the second charge, while leading in the front, Lieut. Lewis Thompson received a shot through his body and another in his arm, just as he had shouted, Come on, my brave boys, follow me! He fell into the arms of Col. Johnson, who says he was as brave a man as he ever saw. Capt. Thompson also behaved withCapt. Thompson also behaved with great gallantry. He was surrounded once, but extricated himself, receiving many bullets through his clothing, but sustaining no personal injury. It is stated of Capt. Anderson, the veteran hero who fell early in the engagement, that this was his fifty-eighth battle. Col. Johnson said on the battle-field, that he could storm Arlington Heights with ten thousand such troops as the boys from the Northwest, Johnson was always in the thickest of the fight, sometimes with a club in his hand, bu
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. (search)
our batteries, and forced to make a rapid retreat. They carried most of their wounded down the mountain to the ambulances, though some were left on the field. Captain Anderson, of the Lee Battery, was shot dead from his house at an early period of the fight. A letter to Judge Camden mentions the death of an officer of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment but gives no name. We also hear that Lieutenant Reagan was killed: but there are contradictory statements relative to the death of Lieut. Lewis Thompson. The North western boys behaved most gallantly, and deserve much praise for their heroic conduct. They advanced and attacked the enemy three separate times, and, being thus exposed, suffered more heavily than any other troops. Only two companies of the Fifty second Virginia Regiment (Colonel Baldwinis) were engaged in the fight--Captain Skinner's and Captain Lilley's. Several were wounded in these companies, but only one was killed. Our informants state that Col. Johnson "cov
the thicket, with cannister shot, and sent many a poor Hessian to his last account. From another letter, addressed to a gentleman in this city, we glean the following incidents: In the second charge, while leading in the front, Lieut. Lewis Thompson received a shot through his body and another in his arm, just as he had shouted "Come on my brave boys, follow me!" He fell into the arms of Col. Johnson, who says he was as brave a man as he ever saw. Capt. Thompson also behaved witCapt. Thompson also behaved with great gallantry. He was surrounded once, but extricated himself, receiving many bullets through his clothing, but sustaining no personal injury. It is stated of Capt. Anderson, the veteran hero who fell early in the engagement, that this was his fifty-eighth battle. Col. Johnson said on the battle field, that he could storm Arlington Heights with 10,000 such troops as the boys from the Northwest. Johnson was always in the thickest of the fight, sometimes with a club in his hand, bu