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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for M. Jefferson Thompson or search for M. Jefferson Thompson in all documents.

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out the rebel forces which were reported to be in that vicinity blockading roads and molesting the persons and property of Union citizens, I left with my command on the morning of the 10th instant, accompanied by Lieut. Col. James Keigwin, of the Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and marched to Big Creek Gap via Boston. My force consisted of the Second East Tennessee Regiment; Company A, of the First East Tennessee Regiment, Captain Cooper; Company B, of the Forty-ninth Indiana Regiment, Captain Thompson, and a detachment of Lieutenant-Colonel Munday's First Battalion Kentucky Cavalry. We arrived at the foot of the Cumberland Mountains, on the north side, on the 13th instant, at 6 o'clock p. m. I then learned that two companies of the First Tennessee Regiment rebel cavalry were encamped at Big Creek Gap. Finding the road completely blockaded, I detached the cavalry, and sent them around by another road, with orders to meet the main body of the command at a certain point on the oppo
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ere was no force of the enemy in the vicinity where I had been sent to attack them, returned to camp at 10 o'clock next morning, the command having marched 35 miles. Complying with orders of Colonel Elliott, May 27 left camp at Farm. ington at 1 a. m.; marched over a very broken country to the main ford of Yellow Creek; crossed that evening the railroad above Iuka about 2 miles, keeping a southerly course. Bivouacked at 2 a. m. at a good stream 6 miles south of Iuka, a place known as Thompson's, pushed forward at daylight, marching southwest over a very rough country, intersected by the swamps of the Tombigbee, and reached Booneville at daylight in the morning, and I was immediately ordered to move on the town, filled with sick and convalescent. Following Col. W. L. Elliott's instructions, destroyed the contents of 26 cars and depot, 13,000 stand of arms, equipments for 10,000 men, and an immense amount of stores and ammunition. Some of our men, going too far from us in their
illiam K. Strong, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Capt. J. E. Montgomery, C. S. Navy. No. 3.-Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, Missouri State Guard. No. 1.-report of Brig. Gen. William K. Strong, U. S. Army. Van Dorn was above four of the enemy's boats. As our remaining boats, the General M. Jeff. Thompson, Capt. J. H. Burke; the Colonel Lovell, Capt. J. C. Delancy, and the General Beauregard, Capt. ed no serious injuries. Our casualties were 2 killed and 1 wounded-arm broken. General M. Jeff. Thompson was on the General Bragg; his officers and men were divided among the boats. They werrvice. General G. T. Beauregard, Comdg. C. S. Army of the West. No. 3.-report of Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, Missouri State guard. Confederate States River defense service, Gunboat General men acted, as they always have, bravely and obediently. Yours, most respectfully, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, Missouri State Guard, Comdg. Confederate Troops on Fleet. General G. T
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
tulatory letter from Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. For incomplete report of Colonel Ellet, received too late for insertion here, see p. 925. No. 5.-Correspondence relating to the occupation of Memphis, Tenn. No. 6.-Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, Missouri State Guard. No. 7.-Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Col. Graham N. Fitch, Forty-sixth Indiana Infantry. steamer H. Von Phul, City of Memphis, June 6, 1862. The rebel fleet was found moorehe casualties, as we were hurried iu our retirement from Memphis, and none but those from the Lovell escaped on the Tennessee side of the river. So soon as more informa tion can be collected I will report. Yours, most respectfully, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, Missouri State Guard. General G. T. Beauriegard, C. S. A., Baldwin, Miss. No. 7.-report of Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruqgles, C. S. Army. headquarters, Grenada, June 6, 1862. Memphis surrendered to the enemy at 10 o
h that point, I recrossed the mountain at night by way of Tracy City. On reaching Tracy City I learned the enemy were already in possession of Jasper, and my command would be entirely cut off from Chattanooga before I could possibly reach there. I determined to shape my course toward McMinnville, by way of Altamont, which I did. On reaching a point some 6 or 8 miles from MeMinnville I learned that a body of the enemy's cavalry were at that place. I immediately moved forward with Captains Thompson's, McLemore's, and D. W. Alexander's companies, overtaking the enemy in Readyville, about 12 miles east of Murfreesborough, capturing 68, killing 8 of their number, and wounding others. I brought the prisoners to the Sparta road, where I thought it expedient to parole them. The party captured was composed of parts of Colonel Wynkoop's Pennsylvania regiment, Fourth Kentucky, and about 14 of Andrew Johnson's body guard, under the command of Captain Ulkhout. The greater portion of the