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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for M. Jefferson Thompson or search for M. Jefferson Thompson in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
o Maine and saw Governor Washburn. I told him I wanted a regiment and a battery, and that I wished that he would appoint as the colonel, George F. Shepley, Esq., who had been United States Attorney for Maine. He was a Democratic leader and had been with me in the Charleston convention. Certainly, said the governor; what a good thing it would be if Shepley would only go. I have seen him, I replied, and I can assure you that he will. For the command of the battery I recommended Captain Thompson, one of the best artillery officers that I ever knew, as well as one of the most pronounced Hunker Democrats. But I may say here that when he got to New Orleans and saw the iniquities of the system, he turned out the most virulent opponent of slavery in my command, save Phelps. I then went to Rhode Island, and was treated with great courtesy and consideration by the governor. He told me that he much regretted he could not aid me in recruiting a regiment in Rhode Island, because Gen
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
tion up St. Charles Street. The cause of it was in a moment apparent. The Sixth Maine battery, a finely equipped artillery company with six Napoleons, under Captain Thompson, had been encamped in Tivoli Circle. St. Charles Street, down which the battery was coming, was at that time paved with foot square granite blocks, which were in a very uneven condition. Thompson was one of the most dare-devil furious riders I ever saw, and he was leading his battery down the street as if there were nobody in it, every horse driven at the fullest speed and the bugles sounding the charge. No one who has not seen such a charge can imagine the terrible noise and clamor over the uneven stones. As I said, the mob was hushed. They turned their eyes on the approaching avalanche and then sought safety in flight. By the time Captain Thompson saluted as he went by, the whole street was cleared; and when he came into battery at the corner, with three guns to clear each street, the scene was as quie
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. (search)
gment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th inst spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on J