hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for M. Jefferson Thompson or search for M. Jefferson Thompson in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Madrid without a man having received a single scratch. The Carondelet and her commander had made good, and the next morning lay ready to support the army after having achieved one of the greatest feats in the record of the inland navy. On April 6th, her elated and plucky crew captured and spiked the guns of the battery opposite Point Pleasant, an event which convinced the Confederates that Island No.10 must be evacuated. That very night, encouraged by the success of the Carondelet, Commander Thompson, with the Pittsburgh, ran by the disheartened gunners on Island No.10 and joined Commander Walke. The crossing of Pope's forces then proceeded, and the Confederates, in full retreat, were hemmed in by Paine's division and surrendered, before dawn of April 8th. Colonel Cook's troops cut off in their retreat from Island No.10, were also compelled to surrender. The daring of Commander Walke in the face of this great danger had accomplished the first step in the opening of the Mississipp
ch were ordinary river steamers purchased and altered to suit the purposes of the navy. Covered to a height of eleven feet above the water line with railroad iron a half to three-quarters of an inch thick, and with their boilers still further protected, they were able to stand up to the fire of even moderate-sized guns. Many a gun in the Confederate fleets and forts was silenced by the well-directed fire of the two Light bow-rifles with which some of the tin-clads were equipped. M. Jeff. Thompson. in a few minutes she had reached the goal and her officers and men leaped from the deck and ran for the protection of the woods. A moment later a shell exploded on her deck, set her on fire and she was burned to the water's edge. Closely following the Jeff. Thompson were the Bragg and the Sumter, and the crews of both escaped in like manner to the swamps and forests of Arkansas. Of all the eight Confederate gunboats the General Van Dorn alone evaded her pursuers and made her escape
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
. Union, 33d Ohio and Col. Metcalf's Ky. Vols. Confed., Col. J. S. Williams' command. Losses: Union 6 killed, 24 wounded. Confed. 18 killed, 45 wounded, 200 captured. November 10, 1861: Guyandotte, W. Va. Union, 9th Va. Vols. Confed., Jenkins' Cav. Losses: Union 7 killed, 20 wounded. Confed. 3 killed, 10 wounded. November 12, 1861: Occoquan River and Pohick Church, Va. Union, 2d, 3d, 5th Mich., 37th N. Y., 4th Me., 2 cos. 1st N. Y. Cav., Randolph's and Thompson's Batteries U. S. Art. Confed., outposts of Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union 3 killed, 1 wounded. November 23, 1861: Ft. Pickens, Pensacola, Fla. Union, Cos. C and E 3d U. S. Inft., Cos. G and 16th N. Y., Batteries A, F, and L 1st U. S. Artil., and C, H, and K 2d U. S. Artil. Confed., Gen. Braxton Bragg's command in Fort McRee and numerous shore batteries. Losses: Union 5 killed, 7 wounded. Confed. 5 killed, 93 wounded. November 26, 1861: Drainesville,