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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Elizabeth 1821-1899 (search)
n, Vt., Feb. 21, 1821; was the daughter of Samuel Rowell, a farmer, and at the age of nine went out to service. Her education was chiefly self-acquired. While on a visit to Boston in 1843 her remarkable beauty so attracted the attention of Thomas Thompson, a millionaire, that they were married within a year. At Mr. Thompson's death the entire income of his immense estate was left to her. She gave large sums of money to the cause of temperance and charity; provided $10,000 for a thorough inveMr. Thompson's death the entire income of his immense estate was left to her. She gave large sums of money to the cause of temperance and charity; provided $10,000 for a thorough investigation of yellow fever in the South; founded the town of Longmont, at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, and gave 640 acres of land and $300 to each colonist there. She contributed largely to the purchase of the Vassar College telescope; purchased and presented to Congress Francis B. Carpenter's painting of the Signing of the emancipation proclamation by President Lincoln in the presence of his cabinet, and for this was granted the freedom of the floor. She also contributed large sums to the
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Organization of army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ite; 8th Georgia regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Towers; 9th Georgia regiment, Colonel B. F. Beck; 11th Georgia regiment, Colonel F. H. Little. Jenkins' brigade Commander: Brigadier-General M. Jenkins---2d South Carolina Rifles, Colonel Thomas Thompson; 1st South Carolina regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel David Livingston; 5th South Carolina regiment, Colonel A. Coward; 6th South Carolina regiment, Colonel John Bratton; Hampton's Legion, Colonel M. W. Gary. Second corps---Lieutenant-Gene--Colonel S. Crutchfield. Lt. Col. Thos. H. CarterPage   4    Maj. Carter M. BraxtonFry 2   1   Carter 2 1 1   Reese  31    7 rifles; 6 Naps.; 2 Hows.         Lt. Col. H. P. JonesCarrington   4    Major BrockenboroughGarber   4     Thompson 2  1    Tanner  2 1   4 rifles; 8 Naps.; 2 Hows.         Lt. Col. S. AndrewsBrown 4      Major LatimerDermot   4     Carpenter  22     Raine 22     10 rifles;
granted to the following named persons (and perhaps others) besides those who have already been mentioned:— Daniel Champney, 1691. William Russell, 1696-1715. Samuel Phipps, 1707-1709. Elizabeth Phipps, 1710-1712. Edward Marrett, 1709. Susanna Stacey, 1709, 1713-1715. Hannah Stacey, 1712, 1716-1724. Ruth Child, 1713-1715. Samuel Robinson, 1714-1720. John Smith, 1715-1717. James Ingham, 1716-1720. Samuel Smith, 1716-1735. James Cutler, 1718-1735. Thomas Thompson, 1721-1724. Elizabeth Thompson, 1725. Thomas Brown, 1721. William Bond, 1722-1724. Peter Oliver, 1727-1729. Joshua Gamage, 1729-1731. Daniel Champney, Jr., 1730-1733. Thomas Holt, 1730-1731. Thomas Dana, 1731-1735. William Bowen, 1732. Jonathan Starr, 1735. During the early part of the present century, the Davenport Tavern, at the westerly corner of North Avenue and Beech Street, was widely celebrated for the concoction of flip; and in the easterly sect
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Missionary ridge, beleaguering Rosecrans, whose troops soon began to suffer for want of food. Longstreet, in command on the left, had the important duty of holding the river line of communication, and cutting off Rosecrans' supplies. Hood's division, at this time, was commanded by Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins, and Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, which joined Longstreet after Chickamauga. The First regiment was under command of Col. F. W. Kilpatrick; the Second Rifles, of Col. Thomas Thompson; the Fifth, of Col. A. Coward; the Sixth, of Col. M. W. Gary, and the Palmetto Sharpshooters, of Col. Joseph Walker. In October, 1863, Rosecrans was replaced by Thomas, Grant became commander-in-chief in the West, and prompt efforts were made by them to relieve Chattanooga. On Longstreet's part Law's brigade of Jenkins' division was moved down the river below Lookout mountain, and on the 28th the brigade observed a force from Chattanooga cross the river and seize a strong position
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
rst battalion of rifles, was stationed on John's island. In the following February, by the addition of four companies, the Second South Carolina Rifle regiment was formed, Moore being promoted to colonel, Boggs to lieutenant-colonel and Capt. Thomas Thompson to major, and in May the regiment was ordered to Virginia, where it was under General Ripley's command at the time of the battle of Seven Pines, and during the Seven Days battles in Anderson's brigade, afterward Jenkins'. Captain Bowen let suffered heavy loss during its first year in Virginia. At Second Manassas Colonel Moore was killed, Captain White, of Abbeville, and many other brave officers and men. Soon afterward, the noble Lieutenant-Colonel Boggs died of disease, and Major Thompson was promoted to colonel; R. A. Thompson, Company B, to lieutenant-colonel, and Capt. D. L. Cox, Company D, to major. When Longstreet's corps went to Georgia, the lieutenant-colonel having resigned and the colonel being on detail and the majo
October, and that the several masters be instructed to make this examination rather an exhibition of the schools in the higher classes than a regular recitation of the whole school, and that means be used to induce the parents and others interested to attend the examination, care being taken that the exercises be generally interesting from their excellence and not wearisome from their number or length. 1823-24. School No. 2, at the Neck, was vacated in July by Joseph Reynolds, and Thomas Thompson was engaged for the month of August. September 1, Henry Adams was engaged, and began his labors there, at a salary of $600. In October the school in district No. 1, under Messrs. Sawyer and Gordon, was examined and gave satisfaction. October 20, Cornelius Walker succeeded Mr. Sawyer as teacher. The female school, under Luther S. Cushing and Miss Sprague, was kept six months. The examination was highly gratifying, especially Miss Sprague's work. May 3, 1824, this school opened again,
Theta Delta Chi Fraternity, 2. Thirteenth Maine Regiment, 27, 37. Thirty-first Massachusetts Regiment, 27, 32, 36. Thompson, 95. Thompson, Dr. Abram R., 64, 66, 67, 70, 71, 72, 90. Thornton, Dr., Matthew. 86. Thompson, Mrs., 93, 95, 96. Thompson, Dr. Abram R., 64, 66, 67, 70, 71, 72, 90. Thornton, Dr., Matthew. 86. Thompson, Mrs., 93, 95, 96. Thompson Square, 84. Thompson, Thomas, 97. Thompson, Timothy, 63, 64. Thompson, Timothy, Jr., 40. Three Pole Lane, 74. Tillotson, Mr., 45. Town Hill, 100. Tremont Street, Boston, 27. Trumbal, Samll, 85. Trumbull, John, 88. TrumbuThompson, Mrs., 93, 95, 96. Thompson Square, 84. Thompson, Thomas, 97. Thompson, Timothy, 63, 64. Thompson, Timothy, Jr., 40. Three Pole Lane, 74. Tillotson, Mr., 45. Town Hill, 100. Tremont Street, Boston, 27. Trumbal, Samll, 85. Trumbull, John, 88. Trumbull, Mary (Jones), 88. Trumbull, Richard, 41. Trumbull, Samuel, 88. Trumbull, Timothy, 15, 88. Tufts, Miss, Abigail, 93. Tufts College, 1, 2. Tufts, Edmund, 93. Tufts, Isaac, 64, 72, 73, 74, 90, 91, 92, 96. Tufts, Joel, 73, 90, 91, 92, 94. Thompson, Thomas, 97. Thompson, Timothy, 63, 64. Thompson, Timothy, Jr., 40. Three Pole Lane, 74. Tillotson, Mr., 45. Town Hill, 100. Tremont Street, Boston, 27. Trumbal, Samll, 85. Trumbull, John, 88. Trumbull, Mary (Jones), 88. Trumbull, Richard, 41. Trumbull, Samuel, 88. Trumbull, Timothy, 15, 88. Tufts, Miss, Abigail, 93. Tufts College, 1, 2. Tufts, Edmund, 93. Tufts, Isaac, 64, 72, 73, 74, 90, 91, 92, 96. Tufts, Joel, 73, 90, 91, 92, 94. Tufts, John, 98, 99. Tufts, Nathan, 2nd., 90. 96, 97, 99. Tufts, Oliver, House, 23. Tufts, P., 72. Tufts, Peter, Jr., 21, 63, 66, 90. Tufts, Samuel, 21, 43, 63, 64. Tufts, Dr., Simon. 85. Tufts, Timothy, 21. 22, 63. Tufts, Timothy, Esq.
Miscellaneous cases. --Thomas H. Dugan, of the Tiger Rifles, and T. H. M. Kenna, a Georgia soldier, were before the Mayor yesterday for over-drinking, and sent to Gen. Winder who will probably see that they are forward to their companies. Thos. Thompson, another soldier, for a similar indiscretion, was held to await the call of his officer. Nathan Siegel and Michael Tool, for drunkenness and disorderly behavior, were each required to give security to keep the peace. James Woodson, was fined $5 for purchasing, chickens in the Second Market to sell again and the fowls were sequestered by the city. Wesley Adams, free negro, was fined $5 for buying chickens, eggs, butter, and chestnuts in the Second Market, to sell again, and the miscellaneous country produce was declared confiscated.
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --The following parties were committed to jail yesterday for the offences set opposite to their names, viz:--Thomas Thompson, for disporting himself in an unseemly manner while drunk, on Main street opposite the Arlington House; Abraham Russell for attempting to stick a bayonet in Nat Quinlin, in the First Market; Charles H. Althizer and John H. Gatewood, until the 12th inst., as accomplices in the murder of Edwin Hamilton; Thomas Ginty, for violently assaulting Margaret Farlan with an axe; Henry Stratton, for treasonable language towards the Confederacy; John Gold and Elias Paulding. for a similar offence, until 5th of March; Geo. Jones, a member of the Public Guard, until second Monday in May, for trial before the Hustings Court, for unlawfully entering Wm. Burton's house and helping him self to a portion of its contents; Charles Tickwell, arrested for the use of incendiary language, and expressing sentiments hostile to the Government of the C. S. A.
Shocking affair. --A young man named Alfred Locker got into a difficulty with Thomas Thompson, on Sunday last, at Long Old Fields, in this county, and deliberately cut his throat with a knife. Thompson fell dead on the instant, and Locker has been committed to jail.-- Marlboro' (Md.) G July 22. Shocking affair. --A young man named Alfred Locker got into a difficulty with Thomas Thompson, on Sunday last, at Long Old Fields, in this county, and deliberately cut his throat with a knife. Thompson fell dead on the instant, and Locker has been committed to jail.-- Marlboro' (Md.) G July 22.
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