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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 2 Browse Search
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certed signal from Major Elliott, or whensoever the approach of hostile boats shall be evident. Concert of action, however, is most desirable. This order was also sent to Brigadier-General Hagood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 1st, 1863. His Excellency M. L. Bonham, Governor of South Carolina, etc., etc.: Governor,—Your letter of the 24th inst. enclosing one from Colonel Waddy Thompson, and another from Messrs. Pullian and Patten, has been received. I have ordered a light battery to report at once to Colonel Williams, at Greenville, S. C. I regret as much as you do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already too small forces a regiment of old troops from the defence of Charleston. So soon as it can be done with safety I will gladly send all the assistance
arrow, of the 64th Georgia, a brave and gallant officer, received a fatal shot while gallantly attempting to rally his men. Captain Wheaton, and the officers and men of his battery, are entitled to special commendation for their courage, coolness, and efficiency. Captain Grattan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieutenant Colquitt, Assistant Department Commander; Major Ely, and Lieutenant Estill, of my staff, were active and conspicuous in every part of the field. My thanks are due to Lieutenant Thompson, 2d Florida regiment, and Mr. Sterling Turner, volunteer aids, for their gallant service. The names of those in the ranks entitled to be particularly mentioned may be furnished in a subsequent report. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. H. Colquitt, Brig.-Genl. Charleston, S. C., March 1st, 1864. General Samuel Cooper, A. and Ins.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General Beauregard left 28th ultimo for Florida. General Gardner, in command there, reports that General Gillmore i
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
r as the duty of man, and declaring that in the sweat of his face shall he eat his bread. The Slave-Master says, No! this is true of the slave, of the black man, but not of the white man: he shall not eat his bread in the sweat of his face. Thus is the brand of degradation stamped upon that daily toil which contributes so much to a true Civilization. It is a constant boast in the Slave States, that white men there will not perform work performed in the Free States. Mr. Calhoun and Mr. Waddy Thompson made this boast. Let it be borne in mind, then, that, where Slavery prevails, there is not only despair for the black man, but inequality and ignominy for the white laborer. By necessary consequence, the latter, whether emigrating from our Free States or fleeing from oppression and wretchedness in his European home, avoids a region disabled by such a social law. Hence a twofold injustice: practically he is excluded from the land, while the land itself becomes a prey to that paralysis
r as the duty of man, and declaring that in the sweat of his face shall he eat his bread. The Slave-Master says, No! this is true of the slave, of the black man, but not of the white man: he shall not eat his bread in the sweat of his face. Thus is the brand of degradation stamped upon that daily toil which contributes so much to a true Civilization. It is a constant boast in the Slave States, that white men there will not perform work performed in the Free States. Mr. Calhoun and Mr. Waddy Thompson made this boast. Let it be borne in mind, then, that, where Slavery prevails, there is not only despair for the black man, but inequality and ignominy for the white laborer. By necessary consequence, the latter, whether emigrating from our Free States or fleeing from oppression and wretchedness in his European home, avoids a region disabled by such a social law. Hence a twofold injustice: practically he is excluded from the land, while the land itself becomes a prey to that paralysis
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ison in Mexico into which he was cast with others who had not succumbed to the desert, or to the brutality of Armijo, at the request of the United States Minister, Waddy Thompson, whose Recollections of Mexico (1846) mentions this release of Kendall and his companions in misery, as well as the release of the prisoners taken by thferings, and release of these latter unfortunates are told by William Preston Stapp in his book The prisoners of Perote (1845). It is interesting to note that Waddy Thompson was no longer a United States official when he requested the freedom of the captives; General Santa Anna granted the request as a personal favour. Thompson gThompson gives an estimate of Santa Anna's character which is not so black as the usual descriptions. Kendall printed a map, which he compiled, to give such information as was possible of the wilderness the caravan had struggled through, and in this he was aided by notes from Josiah Gregg, then living and doing business as a merchant at
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
n. Third degree, the, 287 13th Chair, The, 293 Thirty-one years on the Plains and Mountains, 153 $30,000 Bequest, The, 14 Thirty years of labour, 358 Thirty years view . . . 1820 to 1850, 139 Thoburn, J. M., 212 Thomas, Augustus, 278, 279, 280, 282– 83, 284, 285, 287 Thomas, A. E., 294 Thomas, Edith, 312 Thomas, Isaiah, 537 n. Thompson, D. P., 416 Thompson, Denman, 285 Thompson, Maurice, 91 Thompson, R. E., 436 Thompson, S., 28 n., 29 n. Thompson, Waddy, 132, 133 Thomson, James, 539, 452 Thoreau, 112, 115, 116, 162, 313, 415 Thorndike, E. L., 422 Thorpe, 479 Those extraordinary Twins, 18 Thoughts and things, 257 Thoughts suggested by Mr. Froude's progress, 124 Thoughts on the present collegiate system of the United States, 413 Thoughts on the study of political economy, 431 Thoughts on the increasing wealth . . . of the United States, 432 Thousand years ago, a, 277 Three decades of Federal legislation, 35
cious and most of the useful metals in abundance-- Mexico is a powerless and declining State. Declining, indeed, it is; for, though it has extracted from the earth one hundred and fifty milllions of the precious metals, it is poorer at this day than when the mines were discovered, although its exports of produce, other than metals, in 1802, were $9, 186,212, they had fallen off in 1842 to $1,500,000, and none can tell what they are at present, or even whether there be any at all. Mr. Waddy Thompson says in his Recollections of Mexico: The immense estates of which I have spoken, of eighty and a hundred leagues square, with eighty or a hundred thousand cattle, and fifteen or twenty thousand mules and horses, yield very little profit. Perhaps not one acre of ten thousand on these estates is cultivated. Now and then the Government purchases five hundred or a thousand horses for the army; but, with this exception, there are very few occasions when they can be there are very few
House of Delegates. Thursday, April 4th, 1861. The House met at 7½ o'clock, pursuant to adjournment. The Speaker vacated the chair in order to sign enrolled bills, and Mr. Thompson was called thereto. Mr. Seddon offered a resolution, which was adopted, authorizing the Governor to employ the convicts in altering, repairing and enlarging the Penitentiary. The Senate afterwards agreed to it, and so informed the House. A message was received from the Senate, through Mr. Johnson, that that body was ready to adjourn. Mr. Carpenter offered a resolution thanking Speaker Crutchfield for the dignity, ability, and impartiality with which he had presided over the deliberations of the House, which was carried unanimously. Mr. Kaupman offered a resolution complimenting W. E. M. Wood, Sergeant-at-Arms, for the faithful discharge of his duties. Carried. Mr. McCur suggested that members, for the benefit of their successors, had better leave the keys of their desks behind th