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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Zodoc 1796-1856 (search)
Thompson, Zodoc 1796-1856 Geologist; born in Bridgewater, Vt., May 23, 1796; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1823; removed to Canada in 1833; studied theology and was ordained in the Protestant Episcopal Church; became a professor in the Vermont Episcopal Seminary in 1837; was State geologist of Vermont in 1845-48; accepted the chair of Chemistry and Natural History in the University of Vermont in 1851. He was the author of Gazetteer of the State of Vermont; History of the State of Vermont to 1832; History of Vermont, natural, Civil, and statistical; Guide to Lake George, Lake Champlain, Montreal, and Quebec; Geography and Geology of Vermont, etc. He died in Burlington, Vt., Jan. 19, 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Three rivers, battle of (search)
ree rivers, battle of When a large British and German force began to arrive in the St. Lawrence (May, 1776) the Americans retreated up the river to the mouth of the Sorel. A British force took post at Three Rivers. General Sullivan sent General Thompson with Pennsylvania troops, led by St. Clair, Wayne, and Irvine, to attack the British there. Thompson was badly beaten, and he and Irvine, with 150 private soldiers, were made prisoners. This disaster discouraged Sullivan, and he was compel When a large British and German force began to arrive in the St. Lawrence (May, 1776) the Americans retreated up the river to the mouth of the Sorel. A British force took post at Three Rivers. General Sullivan sent General Thompson with Pennsylvania troops, led by St. Clair, Wayne, and Irvine, to attack the British there. Thompson was badly beaten, and he and Irvine, with 150 private soldiers, were made prisoners. This disaster discouraged Sullivan, and he was compelled to abandon Canada.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
May 9, 1833, and an additional treaty at Fort Gibson, March 28, 1834, for their removal to the Indian Territory; Indians reject the treaty of their chiefs. General Thompson sent by the United States to insist on its execution......Oct. 28, 1834 [Seminole War waged 1835-42.] Second session convenes......Dec. 1, 1834 Johnin his message, suggests laws to prohibit the circulation of antislavery documents through the mails. Great fire in New York City......Dec. 16-17, 1835 General Thompson, Lieut. C. Smith, and others massacred by the Seminole Indians at Fort King, 60 miles southwest of St. Augustine, Fla.......Dec. 28, 1835 [Osceola, whom General Thompson had shortly before put in irons for a day, led this war-party.] Maj. F. L. Dade, with 100 men, moving from Fort Brooke to the relief of Gen. Clinch, is waylaid and the entire party killed except four, who afterwards die of injuries there received......Dec. 28, 1835 Treaty with the Cherokee Indians in Georgia