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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. A. Thompson or search for J. A. Thompson in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
r Acting-Ensigns J. P. Randall and J. G. Koehler, from the Tahoma, and forty men, under Acting-Ensigns F. A. Strandberg and Edward Balch, and Acting-First-Assistant Engineer G. M. Bennett, from the Adela, with Acting-Master's Mate Crane and Mr. J. A. Thompson as guides, was landed at Ballast Point. The whole expedition was under the immediate command of Acting-Master T. R. Harris, executive officer of the Tahoma. The line of march was quietly taken up under guidance of Mr. Thompson (who, beiMr. Thompson (who, being too ill to walk, was carried in a litter). A march of fourteen miles brought the party, before daylight, to the river-bank. As soon as it was light the two steamers were discovered on the opposite side. The force was assembled abreast of the steamers, and those on board brought under aim of the rifles, and ordered to send a boat, which was done. A detachment was then sent to bring over the vessels and to make prisoners of their crews. At this time two men succeeded in escaping from th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
old its own; and, merely by securing negative results in the ensuing campaign, the Democratic party would be able to overthrow the Administration, and open negotiations for peace with the Confederacy. In accordance with this idea, President Davis prepared to open communication with the Democratic party of the North, and to conduct political negotiations with that party in accordance with the military movements in the coming campaign. The commissioners appointed for this purpose were Messrs. Thompson, of Mississippi, Holcombe, of Virginia, and Clay, of Alabama, who were to proceed to a convenient spot on the northern frontier of the United States, and to use whatever political opportunities the military events of the war might disclose. The commissioners succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, and reached Canada, only to find that the Northern sentiment in regard to the Confederacy was practically unanimous, and that all parties were determined to bring the seceding Stat