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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Joseph P. Thompson or search for Joseph P. Thompson in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
of the Dictionary of the English Language,—a neighbor of Longfellow, and a good friend of Sumner. In New York Sumner made a few calls, among them one on Joshua Leavitt, at the office of the Independent, where he met for the first time Rev. J. P. Thompson. Some Glimpses of Senator Sumner, by J. P. Thompson, D. D. New York Independent, April 30, 1874. John Bigelow came to dine with him; but John Van Buren, who was invited, was unable to accept. From his lodgings at Delmonico's he wrote onJ. P. Thompson, D. D. New York Independent, April 30, 1874. John Bigelow came to dine with him; but John Van Buren, who was invited, was unable to accept. From his lodgings at Delmonico's he wrote on the 26th, Thanksgiving Day, letters to relatives and friends, full of tenderness, and showing with what concern he entered on his new career:— My very dear Julia,—Your parting benediction and God-speed, mingling with mother's, made my heart overflow. I thank you both. They will cheer, comfort, and strengthen me in duties where there are many difficulties and great responsibilities. For myself, I do not desire public life; I have neither taste nor ambition for it; but Providence has <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. Congress met Dec. 3, 1855. The Republican senators now numbered nearly one fourth of the Senate, and their exelusion from committees was no longer attempted. Sumner, receiving thirty two votes, was again placed on the committee on pensions, of which the other members were Jones of Iowa (chairman), Clay of Alabama, Seward of New York, and Thompson of New Jersey. On Cass's motion he was appointed one of the two members of the committee on enrolled bills. Greeley, writing in the Tribune, Dec. 14, 1855, of Sumner as one whose reputation as scholar, orator, and statesman is not confined to this hemisphere, said: Mr. Sumner dangles at the tail of two unimportant committees. Such is slavery's confession that she feels the point of his spear,—a truth well known already to others, but never so plainly admitted till now. He spoke at length against the proposition to originate appropriation bills in the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
gratitude to God for his recovery from the assassin's blow. In no statesman's correspondence have there ever been such tributes from the heart. As many as two hundred and fifty approving letters came to Sumner within a month, and were placed among his files, from some of which extracts are given in notes to the speech. (Works, vol. v. pp. 146-174.) Among the writers were S. P. Chase, J. R. Giddings, Carl Schurz, George W. Julian, John Jay, William Curtis Noyes, Hiram Barney, Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, Gerrit Smith, Rev. George B. Cheever, Prof. Benjamin Silliman. J. Miller McKim, Frederick Douglass, John G. Whittier, Josiah Quincy (the elder), Rev. R. S. Storrs (the elder), Rev. John Pierpont, Rev. Henry M. Dexter, Prof. William S. Tyler, John A. Andrew, Francis W. Bird, Henry L. Pierce, Amasa Walker, Lydia Maria Child, Henry I. Bowditch, Neal Dow, and Chief-Justice John Appleton. The Legislature of Massachusetts, then in session, formally approved the speech in a resolution, i