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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
ity of the French Emperor, and the nobility of England with difficulty held back from recognizing the Southern Confederacy through the moral courage of John Bright aid the royal wisdom of the Queen and Prince Consort of England. The impatience of the North is perhaps to be pardoned for the reason of its impelling motive; but it demanded of General McClellan impossibilities. And these were created quite as much by forces in his rear as by those in his front. As for Grant, he was like Thor, the hammerer; striking blow after blow, intent on his purpose to beat his way through, somewhat reckless of the cost. Yet he was the first one of our commanders who dared to pursue his policy of delay without apology or fear of overruling. He made it a condition of his acceptancy of the chief command that he should not be interfered with from Washington. That gave him more freedom and discretion than any of his predecessors. He had somehow, with all his modesty, the rare faculty of contr
the rebels had found quantities of whisky, (with which beverage their stomachs had not been astonished for months,) and were shouting and yelling about the town, as much intoxicated with their victory as with the whisky. The fire had now crept around to the buildings in the square where large amounts of ammunition had been stored; and in the midst of all this riot and destruction, suddenly there came an explosion that seemed to be the very crack of doom. The solid earth shook as though old Thor himself had hit it a whack with his thundering hammer and knocked every thing into universal pl. Men were knocked down in the streets by the concussion; the windows of houses five squares away were completely smashed, sash and all; doors were burst off their hinges; locks and bolts were snapped like glass; the brick walls of one or two houses were caved in like bellying sails, and for half a minute after the first great explosion there was a rattling sound of falling bricks and fragments of
g. Now frequently applied to the lantern which surmounts a dome. Thong. A leathern strap or lash. Thora-co-sco′pi-um. (Surgical.) A Stetho-scope (which see). Tho′ri-um. A heavy gray metal which burns when heated in the air. Thor′ough-bolt. (Shipbuilding.) A bolt going through from side to stile. Thor′ough-brace. (Vehicle.) A strong band or thong extending from the front to the back Cspring and supporting the body. Thowl. See thole. Thrash′ing-machinThor′ough-brace. (Vehicle.) A strong band or thong extending from the front to the back Cspring and supporting the body. Thowl. See thole. Thrash′ing-machine′. (Husbandry.) One for beating out grain from the heads. The normal form operates upon wheat, barley, oats, rye, and timothy. Some modifications have been made for flax and clover-seed. In Egypt, the ancient modes of thrashing have been maintained till modern times. (See Fig. 4196.) Their wheat was bearded. For the fitches are not thrashed with a thrashing instrument, neither is a cart-wheel turned about upon the cummin; but the fitches are beaten out with a st
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
lingering Boston enterprise. Cambridge boys were still sent to sea as a cure for naughtiness, or later as supercargoes, this being a mark of confidence. Groups of sailors sometimes strayed through Cambridge, and there were aromatic smells among the Boston wharves. Lowell in particular had a naval uncle, and he wrote of what had been told from childhood when he said in The Growth of the legend :-- The sailors' night watches are thrilled to the core With the lineal offspring of Odin and Thor. In two respects the group of Cambridge authors had gained from their restricted life certain qualities which some might call bourgeois, and many others admirable. They were all honest men pecuniarily; they habitually paid their debts and lived within their means. Neither in Holmes nor Lowell nor in Longfellow was there anything of that quality of thriftlessness so dear to lovers of the picturesque, but so exasperating to market-men and other base creatures. If the Cambridge men were n
he monitions of conscience. Now, I would not discountenance any form of activity by which Human Freedom, even in a single case, may be secured. But I desire to say, that such an act—too often accompanied by a pharisaical pretension, in strange contrast with the petty performance—cannot be considered an essential aid to the Anti-Slavery Enterprise. Not in this way can any impression be made on an evil so vast as Slavery—as you will clearly see by an illustration which I shall give. The god Thor, of Scandinavian mythology—whose strength surpassed that of Hercules—was once challenged to drain a simple cup dry. He applied it to his lips, and with superhuman capacity drank, but the water did not recede even from the rim, and at last the god abandoned the effort. The failure of even his extraordinary strength was explained, when he learned that the simple cup had communicated, by an invisible connection, with the whole vast ocean behind, out of which it was perpetually supplied, and
he monitions of conscience. Now, I would not discountenance any form of activity by which Human Freedom, even in a single case, may be secured. But I desire to say, that such an act—too often accompanied by a pharisaical pretension, in strange contrast with the petty performance—cannot be considered an essential aid to the Anti-Slavery Enterprise. Not in this way can any impression be made on an evil so vast as Slavery—as you will clearly see by an illustration which I shall give. The god Thor, of Scandinavian mythology—whose strength surpassed that of Hercules—was once challenged to drain a simple cup dry. He applied it to his lips, and with superhuman capacity drank, but the water did not recede even from the rim, and at last the god abandoned the effort. The failure of even his extraordinary strength was explained, when he learned that the simple cup had communicated, by an invisible connection, with the whole vast ocean behind, out of which it was perpetually supplied, and
hown that the North had made sure of a man of strength; a man who held that maneuvering paralyzed hard fighting, and had little faith in it—yet withal one who, if never a great strategist, was a trained and educated soldier and knew how to lift up Thor's hammer, and use it weightily upon his foe. On this side of the Potomac there had been not a whisper for a change in commanders. From the battle of Seven Pines the South had rested, with a serene confidence which may well be called sublime, uponn. Next day the remnant of Edward Johnson's division, in which the Louisianians still maintained the forms of their brigade organizations, was coupled with John B. Gordon's brigade to form a division afterward led by that gallant Georgian. With Thor's hammer; with his tremendous preponderance in men and guns; with all that capacity at will to push a corps against a regiment, Grant was from day to day growing in knowledge of the power which lay in the military genius of R. E. Lee. During all
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
ots Of primal forests the young growth shoots; From the death of the old the new proceeds, And the life of truth from the rot of creeds: On the ladder of God, which upward leads, The steps of progress are human needs. For His judgments still are a mighty deep, And the eyes of His providence never sleep: When the night is darkest He gives the morn; When the famine is sorest, the wine and corn! In the church of the wilderness Edwards wrought, Shaping his creed at the forge of thought; And with Thor's own hammer welded and bent The iron links of his argument, Which strove to grasp in its mighty span The purpose of God and the fate of man! Yet faithful still, in his daily round To the weak, and the poor, and sin-sick found, The schoolman's lore and the casuist's art Drew warmth and life from his fervent heart. Had he not seen in the solitudes Of his deep and dark Northampton woods A vision of love about him fall? Not the blinding splendor which fell on Saul, But the tenderer glory that
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
the mighty bound which the laboring mind of England has taken in our day. hands off! thou tithe-fat plunderer! play No trick of priestcraft here! Back, puny lordling! darest thou lay A hand on Elliott's bier? Alive, your rank and pomp, as dust, Beneath his feet he trod: He knew the locust swarm that cursed The harvest-fields of God. On these pale lips, the smothered thought Which England's millions feel, A fierce and fearful splendor caught, As from his forge the steel. Strong-armed as Thor, a shower of fire His smitten anvil flung; God's curse, Earth's wrong, dumb Hunger's ire, He gave them all a tongue! Then let the poor man's horny hands Bear up the mighty dead, And labor's swart and stalwart bands Behind as mourners tread. Leave cant and craft their baptized bounds, Leave rank its minster floor; Give England's green and daisied grounds The poet of the poor! Lay down upon his Sheaf's green verge That brave old heart of oak, With fitting dirge from sounding forge, And pall o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 21: the Loftier strain: Christus (search)
ies have for so many years breathed through my soul in the better hours of life, and which I trust and believe will ere long unite themselves into a symphony not all unworthy the sublime theme, but furnishing some equivalent expression for the trouble and wrath of life, for its sorrow and its mystery. This of course refers to the great poetic design of his life, Christus, a Mystery, of which he wrote again on December 10, 1849, A bleak and dismal day. Wrote in the morning The Challenge of Thor as prologue or Introitus to the second part of Christus. This he laid aside; just a month from that time he records in his diary, In the evening, pondered and meditated the sundry scenes of Christus. Later, he wrote some half dozen scenes or more of The Golden Legend which is Part Second of Christus, representing the mediaeval period. He afterwards wished, on reading Kingsley's Saint's Tragedy, that he had chosen the theme of Elizabeth of Hungary in place of the minor one employed (Der Ar
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