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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 122 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 42 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 20 0 Browse Search
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
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Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 12: practical lessons from Garrison's career (search)
ts demanded the secession of the North. The Constitution of the United States was a covenant with death and hell, and there must be no Union with slave-holders. Thoreau issued a personal declaration of independence and seceded by himself from the Union. He filed the following document with the town clerk: Know all men by these presents that I, Henry Thoreau, do not wish to be regarded as a member of any incorporated society which I have not joined. Essay on the Duty of Civil Disobedience. And Garrison had as little affection for the government as Thoreau. He would not even use it for his own ends, beyond petitioning it; and I suppose a man might aThoreau. He would not even use it for his own ends, beyond petitioning it; and I suppose a man might address a petition to any institution without any implied approval of it. He showed by the vitality of his own influence that the true life of a community is independent and outside of its governmental forms. God is not in the court or the legislature, but in the human soul, and courts and legislatures are the last places in which
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 9: a literary club and its organ. (search)
s its only authentic record. To know what Emerson individually was, we can go to his books; it is the same with Parker, Thoreau, Alcott. But what it was which united these diverse elements, what was their central spirit, what their collective streTell him his soul lives in an alley. After all, narrowness or enlargement are in the mind. Mr. Henry James, turning on Thoreau the reverse end of a remarkably good telescope, pronounces him parochial, because he made the woods and waters of Concoronely observatory in Paraguay; or when Lafarge erects his isolated studio among the Paradise Rocks near Newport; or when Thoreau studies birds and bees, Iliads and Vedas, in his little cottage by Lake Walden. To look out of the little world into thaspiration; Alcott, the pure idealism; Emerson, the lumen siccum, or dry light. Among members or occasional guests were Thoreau, Jones Very, George P. Bradford, Dr. Le Baron Russell, and a few young theological students from Cambridge, such as Will
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 10: the Dial. (search)
m was that twelve numbers should be given to Mr. R. each quarter for the use of contributors. Of these I receive two. Mr. Thoreau will have it, of course, as we hope his frequent aid. But I did not expect to furnish it to all who may give a piece o, as is J. F. Clarke and others who will write; but I will look at the list when in town next Wednesday. I desired Mr. Thoreau's Persius to be sent him, as I was going away to Cohasset at the time it came out, and I understood from Mr. R. that iorate critical papers--Goethe, Lives of the great Composers, and Festus. Poetry was supplied by Clarke, Cranch, Dwight, Thoreau, Ellery Channing, and, latterly, Lowell; while Parker furnished solid, vigorous, readable, commonsense articles, which, not regard your contempt for the long prosa on Transcendentalism — Progress, etc., any more than Parker's disgust at Henry Thoreau's pieces. You go on a different principle; you would have everything in it good according to your taste, which is,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 12: books published. (search)
man I am happy enough to love. And then came forward this well-taught dancer, springing and pirouetting without one tint of genius, one ray of soul; it was very painful and symbolized much, far more than I have expressed with Sylvain and Mariana. Ms. (W. H. C.) Summer on the Lakes seems to have yielded nothing to the author but copies to give away. It is a pathetic compensation for an unsuccessful book, that the writer at least has an abundant supply of it; and when we consider that Thoreau, eight years later, was carrying up to his garret, as unsold, seven hundred out of the thousand copies of his Week on the Concord and Merrimack, we may well feel that Miss Fuller's little book of travels was successful, if it cost her nothing. At any rate she distributed it with some freedom, writing to Mr. Emerson, May 22, 1845, Thirteen copies of Summer on the Lakes were sent to your address in Boston; five for you, four for Caroline [Sturgis], four to be sent to Sarah Clarke, through Ja
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 18: literary traits. (search)
ociated with them as their equal at least, and was really for a time, as editor of the Dial, their organizer and their point of union. Sharing their advantages, she also shared, to some extent, their drawbacks. If they, with all their more regular training, were yet apt to be discursive, unsystematic, with too much reliance on intuition and imagination,--if that in short was the habit of the time,--it was natural that she should share the fault. Her defects were those of Emerson and of Thoreau and yet, after her Tribune training, she learned to shorten her sword better than either of these; became more capable of precise concentration on a specified point. It is also to be noted that, unlike them, she cannot be judged by her maturest work; not a page of her history of the Roman republic of 1848 remains; we can only infer what it might have been from the progress already seen. And sharing also the drawbacks, she also shared inevitably the prejudices that her companions inspire
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
ury. This large and solid academic basis for Thoreau's culture is not generally observed. His devof that time had no slight effect in moulding Thoreau's character and determining his bent. His more marked and results in what Lowell calls Thoreau's worsification. He had no candid friend to who considers it the most significant act of Thoreau, and more important than his retreat in Waldesure for pursuits they could not comprehend. Thoreau is a prophet of the simple life, perhaps the wn colourless with age. The truth is that Thoreau with all his genuine appreciation of the clasn accounts for the artistic failure. Where Thoreau is not the transcendental essayist, but the fy hating some other country. Emerson defines Thoreau almost in these terms: No truer American ly explain to himself. The reason is that Henry Thoreau in Walden wood is the same as the mariner always be of more interest to the admirer of Thoreau and the student of literature than to the gen[48 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
ign journals, was begun in 1844. The most picturesque of the Boston periodicals of the time was The Dial, published quarterly by a group of New England Transcendentalists from 1840 to 1844. Such an organ of the new thought had long been talked of, and as early as 1835 Emerson had proposed to Carlyle that the latter come to America and act as editor. It was not until July, 1840, however, that the first number of The Dial appeared, with Margaret Fuller as editor, and Emerson, Alcott, and Thoreau among the contributors. The magazine was never financially successful, the smallness of its subscription list being indicated by the rarity of complete sets today. Margaret Fuller, after serving gratuitously for two years, reluctantly resigned the editorship, and Emerson as reluctantly took it up, noting in his diary: I wish it to live, but I do not wish to be its life. Neither do I like to put it into the hands of the Humanity and Reform Men, because they trample on letters and poetry;
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
Chapter 24: Lowell Neither Lowell's poetry nor prose has that obvious unity of effect which characterizes the work of so many nineteenth century writers. His work does not recall, even in the minds of its admirers, a group of impressions so distinct and fixed as those summoned by the poetry of Whittier, Poe, or Whitman, or by that of Swinburne, Morris, or Browning, or by the prose of Thoreau or Emerson, of Ruskin or Arnold. His work, indeed, does not have the marks of a dominant or of a peculiar personality; nor does it add to literature a new group of ideas or a new departure in workmanship. Though its volume is large, and though a number both of his poems and his essays have won a wide familiarity, there is difficulty in summarizing their qualities of form or matter in a way that will indicate with justice his importance in American literature. This somewhat miscellaneous appeal made by his writing may be ascribed in part, no doubt, to a lack of literary power that preve
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: Whitman (search)
the desire thus to present his message in a more personal fashion than any sort of authorship, even his own, could afford, persisted throughout life, only a few memorial addresses—such as the tribute to Lincoln—and a few public readings of his own poems written for college commencements or other special occasions ever came of it. Meanwhile Whitman was widening the circle of his acquaintance. Emerson not only called on him frequently when in the city but sent Alcott, Moncure Conway, and Thoreau to do likewise. Lord Houghton also came, and Bryant crossed the river to share with him long walks into the country. These were the days of Whitman's Bohemianism. A negligent, open-throated attire and great soft hat that one might associate with a carpenter or a sailor he insisted on wearing, Richter-like, wherever he went. In the earlier years of his journalism he had worn a high hat, cane, and boutonniere; now the dandy had given place to a man dressed in a habit more in keeping with
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 6: the Transcendentalists (search)
Plato), of his aunt Mary Moody Emerson, of Thoreau, and of various types of Englishmen in his Eth the words moose and Indian on his lips. Thoreau, like all thinkers who reach below the surfacrase. But to the student of American thought Thoreau's prime value lies in the courage and consistLovers of racial traits like to remember that Thoreau's grandfather was an immigrant Frenchman fromndly President, a year later, in recommending Thoreau as a school-teacher, certified that his rank life. He bends doggedly to the trail, for Henry Thoreau is no quitter, but the trail leads nowhereoods, for the stark and elemental in nature. Thoreau's passion for this aspect of life may have beOnce, toward the close of his too brief life, Thoreau signed on again to an American ideal, and no st the uncivil chaos called Civil Government, Thoreau challenged it to a fight. Indeed he had alree these three figures were, after Emerson and Thoreau, the most representative of the group, the st[11 more...]
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