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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. T. Thornton or search for E. T. Thornton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
Sussex Light Dragoons. [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, Sept. 18, 1897.] A roll of this gallant organization. Something of its history. The following is the original roll of the Sussex Light Dragoons: Captain, Benjamin W. Belshes; First Lieutenant, George H. Dillard; Second Lieutenant, William W. Blow; Junior Second Lieutenant, P. S. Parker; First Sergeant, H. Q. Moyler; Second Sergeant, Thomas A. Dillard; Third Sergeant, E. T. Thornton; Fourth Sergeant, William L. Adkins; Corporals, T. L. Johnson, F. L. Vellines, James E. Barker, Joseph H. Chappel; Privates, A. P. Adkins, J. D. Adkins, B. R. Birdsong, A. S. Birdsong, Henry Birdsong, Jr., J. 18 A. Bishop, J. L. Chappell, E. T. Chappell, R. A. Cocke, T. E. Dillard, R. L. Dobie, J. J. Dillard, W. H. Dillard, E. M. Ellis, A. H. Ellis, W. H. Gwaltney, B. F. Harrison, R. K. Harrison, T. J. Harrison, James H. Harrison, J. W. Harrison, B. L. Hargrave, L. D. Holt, James R. Jones, L. E. Jordan, William E. Lamb, J. W. T.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
to extricate us as quietly as possible, going around himself arousing and cautioning many of the men. We had got a quarter of a mile away, perhaps, and had nearly reached a position of safety beyond the crest of a hill, when we were discovered, and the enemy's guns opened on us. This discharge began the fray on the memorable and sanguinary 17th of September, 1862. One of the first shells fired, striking the earth near us, exploded, covering some of us with dust, and inflicting on brave Colonel Thornton, of the 3rd Virginia Cavalry, a mortal wound. The writer was near him at the moment, and witnessed the shrugging of his shoulders and quiver of the muscles of his face, as he felt the shock of the piece of shell shattering his arm close to the shoulder. We had been, thus far, on the extreme left of our line of battle, and early in the day were ordered to report to General T. J. Jackson, who commanded on the right. Our men, without a round of ammunition left, were seen leisurely ret