hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
The tide of song had been checked for a time; after the second visit to Rome, it flowed more freely than ever. By the winter of 1853-54, a volume was ready (the poems chosen and arranged with the help of James T. Fields), and was published by Ticknor and Fields under the title of Passion flowers. No name appeared on the title-page; she had thought to keep her incognito, but she was recognized at once as the author, and the book became the literary sensation of the hour. It passed rapidlyre and heard them, glowing all over. The authorship is, of course, no secret now. ... Speaking of the volume long after, she says, It was a timid performance upon a slender reed. Three years later a second volume of verse was published by Ticknor and Fields under the title of Words for the hour. Of this, George William Curtis wrote, It is a better book than its predecessor, but will probably not meet with the same success. She had written plays ever since she was nine years old. In 1
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
ed to fill her part, and the whole fell through. This with much other of my best literary work has remained a dead letter on my own shelves. I am glad as well as sad to feel that it deserved better treatment. She had a wheel-chair, and on pleasant days it was her delight to be wheeled through the Public Garden, now in full May beauty, to see the flowers and the children. She was able to attend several meetings, and to write several papers. May 18. Have read part of the recital of Anna Ticknor's achievement in her society to encourage studies at home. Her work is really heroic. I wish that I had better understood it. Still I did admire it a great deal, but had little idea of the great benevolence and sympathy developed in her work, which was a godsend to thousands of women. May 26. My dear son arrived in the evening to celebrate my birthday. He seems well and happy. I was thankful to see him. Flowers kept arriving all day. May 27. Attended church and carried some of
II, 306. Thaxter, Celia, II, 199. Thayer, Adele, II, 312. Thayer, W. R., II, 346. Theseum, I, 275. Thorndike, Mrs., II, 247. Thucydides, II, 47, 98. Thynne, Lady, Beatrice, II, 254. Thynne, Lady, Katherine, II, 254. Ticknor, Anna, II, 345. Ticknor & Fields, I, 137, 143. Tilden, Mr., I, 345. Tilden, Mrs., II, 157. Times, London, I, 372. Tiryns, II, 5. Tiverton, II, 47, 69. Todd, Prof., II, 297. Todd, Mabel Loomis, II, 270, 297, 315. TonawandaTicknor & Fields, I, 137, 143. Tilden, Mr., I, 345. Tilden, Mrs., II, 157. Times, London, I, 372. Tiryns, II, 5. Tiverton, II, 47, 69. Todd, Prof., II, 297. Todd, Mabel Loomis, II, 270, 297, 315. Tonawanda, II, 122. Torlonia, Princess, I, 95. Tormer, —, I, 95. Tosti, Sig., II, 357. Touraine, II, 353. Town and Country Club, I, 347; II, 47, 49-52, 55, 77. Toynbee, Arnold, II, 323. Toynbee Hall, II, 166. Transcendentalism, I, 72. Trench, Mr., II, 247. Trench, Chevenix, II, 247. Trenton, II, 156. Trevelyan, Lady, I, 267. Tribune, Chicago, II, 8, 9, 18, 176. Tribune, N. Y., I, 176, 196, 250, 251; II, 84. Trinity Church, Boston, II, 141, 199. Trip to Cub
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 11: anti-slavery attitude: literary work: trip to Cuba (search)
om this lady, in which she spoke of the fatal Gurowski beauty. It was in the early years of this decade (1850– 1860) that I definitively came before the world as an author. My first volume of poems, entitled Passion Flowers, was published by Ticknor and Fields, without my name. In the choice and arrangement of the poems James T. Fields had been very helpful to me. My lack of experience had led me to suppose that my incognito might easily be maintained, but in this my expectations were disae as we knew them. They thought that we could not fight, and we thought that they would not. Both parties were soon made wiser by sad experience. My account of this trip, after publication in the Atlantic Monthly, was issued in book form by Ticknor and Fields. Years after this time, a friend of mine landed in Cuba with a copy of the book in her hand luggage. It was at once taken from her by the custom-house officers, and she never saw it again. This little work was favorably spoken of a
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 18: certain clubs (search)
Indians of Rhode Island, and another on Bishop Berkeley. Professor Bailey of Providence spoke on insectivorous plants, and on one occasion we enjoyed in his company a club picnic at Paradise, after which the wild flowers in that immediate vicinity were gathered and explained. Colonel Higginson ministered to our instruction and entertainment, and once unbent so far as to act with me and some others in a set of charades. The historian George Bancroft was one of our number, as was also Miss Anna Ticknor, founder of the Society for the Encouragement of Studies at Home. Among the worthies whom we honor in remembrance I must not omit to mention Rev. Charles T. Brooks, the beloved pastor of the Unitarian church. Mr. Brooks was a scholar of no mean pretensions, and a man of most delightful presence. He had come to Newport immediately after graduating at Harvard Divinity School, and here he remained, faithfully at work, until the close of his pastoral labors, a period of forty years. He w
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
Cowper's, 58. Tasso, 176, 206. Taylor, Father (Edward T.), Boston Methodist city missionary, 263. Taylor, Mrs., Peter, founds a college for working women, 333. Terry, Luther, an artist in Rome, 127; married to Mrs. Crawford, 312. Terry, Mrs., Luther, See Ward, Louisa. Thackeray, William M., his admiration for Mrs. Frank Hampton, 234; depicts her in Ethel Newcome, 235. Theatre, the, frowned down in New York, 15, 16. Thoreau, Henry D., Emerson's paper on, 290. Ticknor, Miss, Anna, in the Town and Country Club, 407. Ticknor, George, letter of introduction from, to Miss Edgeworth, 113; to Wordsworth, 115. Tolstoi, Count, Lyeff, his Kreutzer Sonata disapproved of, 17. Torlonia, a Roman banker, anecdote of, 27; ball given by, 123. Torlonia's Palace, 122, 128. Tormer, an artist, 127. Tourgenieff, the Russian novelist, 412. Town and Country Club of Newport founded, 405; its eminent lecturers, 406, 407. Townsend, Mrs. Gideon (Mary A. Van Voorh