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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
ness, or remind him of his debt. You will gather from these desultory and diffuse remarks, that I was very much delighted with Mr. Jeffrey. . . . . All that he knew —and, as far as I could judge, his learning is more extensive than that of any man I ever met—seemed completely incorporated and identified with his own mind; and I cannot, perhaps, give you a better idea of the readiness with which he commanded it, and of the consequent facility and fluency of his conversation, than by saying, with Mr. Ames, that he poured it out like water. You have by this time, I suspect, heard enough of Mr. Jeffrey; at any rate, it is a great deal more than I thought I should send you when I began, as soon as I received yours. I was very soon interrupted. The next day was Edward Everett's ordination, but still I wrote a little. Yesterday I added another page, and this morning (February 11) have finished it. I hope it has coherence and consistency. . . . . Yours affectionately, Geo Ticknor
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
st. Mr. Campbell. Mrs. Siddons. leaves London. arrival in Gottingen. Mr. Ticknor was now twenty-three years old, in full vigor of health and activity of mind way to join their father, then United States Minister at St. Petersburg. Mr. Ticknor wrote many pages during his voyage to his father and mother, full of affectiMr. Southey said he had seen the repudiated article. While in Liverpool, Mr. Ticknor made the acquaintance of Mr. Roscoe, then in the enjoyment of wealth as wellmoved me in one of my own age, and was doubly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 25th of the er. This must be taken as a proof of the power Miss O'Neil exercised, for Mr. Ticknor had often seen Cooke in Boston, and placed his acting above that of any malewhen she was carried off the stage. I absolutely dread to see her again. Mr. Ticknor remained in London a little more than a month, which was to him a period of