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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for George Ticknor or search for George Ticknor in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
and author. Cleveland and Felton remembered him with many letters, full of affection, each detailing his studies, and the latter reporting also the incidents of college life. Lieber invoked his good offices with publishers and critics. Among correspondents who wrote with less frequency were Longfellow, Mr. Daveis, Luther S. Cushing (who wrote concerning The Jurist), Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lawrence, Richard Fletcher, Willard Phillips, and Benjamin Rand; and, after their return from Europe, Mr. Ticknor and Dr. Shattuck. His letters to Judge Story and Hillard were read by other intimate friends, and his experiences became quite generally known in Boston and Cambridge. Americans returning from Europe reported his success in English society. His speech at Newcastle, which was read in a Boston newspaper, was much commended. His social career abroad attracted attention at home, and his return was awaited with unusual interest. The general opinion and expectation concerning him may be
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition of the Latin poet, which was published in 1849, with a dedication to his friend, Lord Lansdowne. is by Milman. Poor man, he is now in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition of the Latin poet, which was published in 1849, with a dedication to his friend, Lord Lansdowne. is by Milman. Poor man, he is now in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ook, because of the pang they gave him. Here Sumner remained till the close of August. Rome and the Campagna have attractions at this season which are withheld in winter, and he always regarded the time of his sojourn there as well chosen. Mr. Ticknor wrote to him, Dec. 3, 1839: I agree with you about the season for seeing Italy. I have been there every month of the year except August, and give me the sunshine even at the expense of the heat. He afterwards referred to these days as the hapenza, was his reply. Ever affectionately yours. Charles Sumner. P. S. I wish you would show this to Cleveland, Felton, and Longfellow, and tell them to consider it as addressed to each and all. Can you not speak to Governor Everett, and Ticknor, and Prescott, in Crawford's behalf? But I will not say more, for you will understand my wishes, and I leave the whole to your discretion. To Henry W. Longfellow, Cambridge. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. my dear Longfellow,—FraGr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
rse (we fly by night) to Heidelberg; then down the Rhine to Cologne; then to Brussels, Antwerp, London,—where I shall be at the end of January,—thence to sail for America. If this letter reaches you by the British Queen, do not fail to write me by the return. Give my love to all my friends; and tell them I shall soon see them. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Cogswell Dr. Joseph Green Cogswell, 1786-1871. He was in 1816 a student at Gottingen with Edward Everett and George Ticknor; in 1823, with George Bancroft, established the Round Hill School at Northampton, Mass., and in 1848 became the Superintendent of the Astor Library. has just arrived at Dresden. I have not seen him; but he speaks of Hyperion as one of the best books that has ever come from our country. To George W. Greene. Berlin, Dec. 30, 1839. dear Greene,—Would I were with you in Rome! Every day I chide myself because I was so idle and remiss while in that Mother-City. I regret that I left s<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
ds, but give me my friends and their cultured minds. I have just found Longfellow's Hyperion, and shall sit up all night to devour it. I have bought up all the copies of Voices of the Night in London, to give to my friends. Have been much disappointed at not finding your brother here. Be on the lookout for me. The Mediator sails fast. I am coming. Love to all, and good-by. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Tell the Judge, and Greenleaf, and Fletcher, I am coming. Tell Ticknor I am his debtor for an interesting letter received at Heidelberg. To Judge Story. London, March 24, 1840. dear Judge,—I shall be on our side of the Atlantic soon,—very soon— perhaps as soon as this sheet, perhaps sooner. This will go in the packet of the 25th March; I go in the London packet (the Wellington) of April 1, leaving Portsmouth, April 4. I first took a berth in the Mediator of the 29th March; but Cogswell and Willis and his wife go on the 4th, so for pleasant company's s<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
Craigie House. He spent many evenings with Mr. Ticknor, comparing their European experiences. Mas he reached home. He frequented those of Mr. Ticknor, Nathan Appleton, Harrison Gray Otis, Abboted about him the scholars of the day,—Sparks, Ticknor, Palfrey, Bancroft, Felton, Longfellow, and Hhich afterwards alienated many others. See Ticknor's Life of Prescott, p. 336. Letters of Prescoemont House, where Story, Prescott, Bancroft, Ticknor, Choate, Hillard, Felton, and Longfellow wereioned are Story, Channing, Allston, Bancroft, Ticknor, Longfellow, R. W. Emerson, and Prescott.—Spe with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfreink Webster has made a mistake in remaining. Ticknor, who has returned from Woods' Hole, remains fd the mission to Vienna, and all posts abroad. Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor speak of him in the highest teMrs. Ticknor speak of him in the highest terms. He must be an accomplished man. Ever yours, C. S. To Lord Morpeth, Albany. Boston, Nov.[1 more...]<
April 29. Your letter to Mary, with its pleasant sketch of Elba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archives of London and Paris. I dined in company with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfrey, Longfellow, Felton, and Hillard,—a goodly fellowship. The conversation was agreeable. I envy you six months in Germany. I was not there long enough to learn the language as I wished. Another six months would make me master of it and of its literature . . . . Ever affectionately yours, Charle
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
tory was also much interested in the legal points, and his advice was sought in relation to them. Sumner's great interest in the Creole question is noted by Mr. Ticknor, who names him as the only person he met, who was vehement against Mr. Webster's letter. Life of George Ticknor, Vol. II. p. 199. It appears also in his vigGeorge Ticknor, Vol. II. p. 199. It appears also in his vigorous letters, written at the time, to Mr. Harvey and Dr. Lieber. He replied in the Advertiser to some legal criticisms which a correspondent of that journal had made on Dr. Channing's pamphlet. His article was printed April 18. The articles of Dr. Channing's critic, signed C., were printed April 14 and 25. In this reply, he t Madrid a year ago. His application was urged by the warmest letters,—from Prescott, who had been invited by Webster to designate some fit person for this place; Ticknor, who is, perhaps, Webster's warmest personal friend; Choate, who has Webster's place in the Senate; and Abbott Lawrence: but no notice was taken of the applicatio