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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George Ticknor or search for George Ticknor in all documents.

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in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population ofhough the party had ceased to exist. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. p. 186. and as soon as Daniel Webs. In 1841, at a dinner where old lawyers and Ticknor were present, Lord Morpeth was struck with thg beyond its letter as well as its spirit. Ticknor was firm in his convictions against antislaveilies. There is a passage in a letter from Ticknor to Hillard relating to the prison-discipline you are buying and circulating them. Life of Ticknor, vol. II. p. 235. The social exclusion practised by Ticknor on Sumner and antislavery men is mentioned in Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pnti-slavery agitation, thought the attempt of Ticknor, the Eliots, and others to ostracize Sumner, and the Friday Club, to the latter of which Mr. Ticknor belonged. At the Thursday Club the custom 388. As to visitors at the house, see Life of Ticknor, vol. i. p. 391; vol. II. p. 482. He had re[6 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
cott, Longfellow in his diary, May 20, 1846, gives an account of one of the dinners at Prescott's where Sumner was present. Sumner was at this time calling at Ticknor's, where Lyell was then a guest; but this was about the end of his connection with that house. who had removed, in 1845, from the family home in Bedford Street to poetic amber. I have mourned with the father in his second loss. Two such sons are rarely given to a single father. To John Bigelow, June 6:— . . . Mr. Ticknor's book is a good dictionary of Spanish literature; but, he is utterly incompetent to appreciate the genius of Spain. Sumner, writing to Longfellow from Montpellier, France, Jan. 24, 1859, said that M. Moudot, the lecturer on Spanish literature at the University, had changed his purpose to translate Ticknor's work into French, being discouraged by its dryness and dictionary character. He cannot look at it face to face. Besides, his style is miserably dry and crude. As a politician her
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
writer. These personalities rankled during the lifetime of the actors. Eliot's social position was of the best, as he was closely connected by marriage with George Ticknor, Edmund Dwight, Benjamin Guild, and Dr. Andrews Norton, and by blood with the Curtis family. The influence of these families ramified in the society of Bostoviews in favor of more vigorous action. the same month, the Society decided to hold no more public meetings, and recalled the notice of one already announced. Mr. Ticknor and George T. Curtis attended the meeting where this decision was made, and both were chosen officers for the first time. They had taken no interest in the subject before, and their political hostility to Sumner and Dr. Howe, as well as Mr. Ticknor's kinship with Mr. Eliot, account for their selection. Eliot became president; and Dwight continued in office till his death, in 1854. In 1855 no officers were chosen, and Mr. Eliot took the chair in the presence of three reporters and only
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
31, 1847, post, pp. 138, 142. and secluded him almost entirely from general society. It ended his visits at Nathan Appleton's. To Lieber, March 22, 1847, Mss. Ticknor's door was closed to him; Ticknor and Sumner had no intercourse after this. They met casually, July 15, 1857, at the house of General Fox, in London, Ticknor Ticknor and Sumner had no intercourse after this. They met casually, July 15, 1857, at the house of General Fox, in London, Ticknor leaving and Sumner arriving at the same moment. General Fox observing that they did not speak, inquired of Sumner as to the cause, and was indignant to learn that the latter's course on slavery was the trouble. and when a guest at a party there inquired if Mr. Sumner was to be present, the host replied, He is outside of the pale oTicknor leaving and Sumner arriving at the same moment. General Fox observing that they did not speak, inquired of Sumner as to the cause, and was indignant to learn that the latter's course on slavery was the trouble. and when a guest at a party there inquired if Mr. Sumner was to be present, the host replied, He is outside of the pale of society. The feeling became so pervasive in Boston's Belgravia that a lady living on Beacon Street, who had invited Sumner with other guests to dinner, received a withdrawal of an acceptance from one of them when he found Sumner was to be present, although he was not at all in politics, and had no personal grievance. Prescott,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
igners Mr. Webster's retainers.—among them merchants like Eliot, Perkins, Fearing, Appleton, Haven, Amory, Sturgis, Thayer, and Hooper; lawyers like Choate, Lunt, B. R. Curtis, and G. T. Curtis; physicians like Jackson and Bigelow; scholars like Ticknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, and Felton; divines like Moses Stuart and Leonard Woods. Its passage was signalized by the firing of one hundred guns on the Common. Webster's partisans, such was their intensity of feeling, very soon obtatin School. Sigma (Lucius M. Sargent) replied to them. Sumner replied under the signature of X in the Christian Register, July 13 and Aug. 3, 1850, to a writer in the same newspaper, June 29 and July 27, signing R, and supposed by Sumner to be Ticknor. The point of controversy in the Register was as to Webster's and Mann's statements of the requirement of a trial by jury under the Constitution in the case of persons claimed as slaves. Two visible mementos of the controversy concerning Webst
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
t Ragatz the tomb of Schelling, in whom he had taken a fresh interest from hearing Mignet's discourse at the Institute. His wanderings during October cannot be traced in order; but after Bellagio he visited Milan, Brescia, Vicenza, Verona, and Venice. From Italy he went to Vienna, Prague, and Dresden. At Berlin he had an interview with Alexander von Humboldt, Humboldt, in appointing the interview, bore tribute to Sumner's noble sentiments. The baron was astonished when assured that Mr. Ticknor was not known in America as an abolitionist. whom he had met there nearly twenty years before. On the last day of the month he was in Nuremberg, whence he wrote, Fire and water have not yet entirely cured me; but I trust that their results will continue to develop in me. Every day I hope to turn the corner. Thence he went to Munich and on to Worms, down the Rhine to Cologne, and after a night at St. Quentin was in Paris by the middle of November. He wrote to E. L. Pierce from Worms,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
e South were divided between Douglas and Bell. In the North the rump of the Whig party—those antipathetic to antislavery sentiments—supported Bell and Everett; and their leaders in Massachusetts were chiefly the old opponents of the Conscience Whigs,—Winthrop, Eliot, Stevenson, G. T. Curtis, Walley, and Hillard. Some of these leaders are described in the New York Tribune; September 17, and the Boston Atlas and Bee, September 28. Felton, at this time President of Harvard College, and George Ticknor voted for Bell and Everett. The Whig conservatism of Boston had been broken up; but a remnant of five thousand votes was given in the city for Bell and Everett, principally cast by voters having a mercantile interest or connection, while the masses gave nearly ten thousand votes for Lincoln, and divided five thousand between the two Democratic candidates, Douglas and Breckinridge. Sumner prepared in the autumn, as a lyceum lecture, a tribute to Lafayette, in which, with a view to arre<