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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
Life of George Ticknor. Chapter 1: Birth and Parentage. Autobiographical sketch. George Ticknor, son of Elisha and Elizabeth (Billings) Ticknor, was born in Boston, on the first day of August, 1791. The circumstances of his birth were all favorable for happiness, and for moral and intellectual growth. His parGeorge Ticknor, son of Elisha and Elizabeth (Billings) Ticknor, was born in Boston, on the first day of August, 1791. The circumstances of his birth were all favorable for happiness, and for moral and intellectual growth. His parents were of the true New England character,—firm in principle, amiable and affectionate, well instructed, and with a thorough value for all culture. In external condition they were neither rich nor poor, and his early life, therefore, was not pampered by luxury nor chilled by poverty. They lived in a free and active community, Ticknor, was born in Boston, on the first day of August, 1791. The circumstances of his birth were all favorable for happiness, and for moral and intellectual growth. His parents were of the true New England character,—firm in principle, amiable and affectionate, well instructed, and with a thorough value for all culture. In external condition they were neither rich nor poor, and his early life, therefore, was not pampered by luxury nor chilled by poverty. They lived in a free and active community, surrounded by intelligent friends, whose position and tastes were like their own, and with whom social intercourse was a benefit as well as a pleasure. To have been born of such a father as his was especially a cause of daily and life-long gratitude. Elisha Ticknor was a man of great purity of character, considerable cultivatio
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
honor on my son bestow, And pay in glory what in life you owe. Fame is at least by heav'nly promise due To life so short, etc. This is miserable enough; the other is better:— Nereus, in faultless shape and blooming grace, The loveliest youth of all the Grecian race. I suppose you are convinced against your will; and I know from Hudibras what I am to expect in such a case; but still, in spite of precedent and authority, I calculate on your submission to Horace, Homer, Milton, and George Ticknor! Vive atque vale. To Charles S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, February 8, 1814. If all the world had their deserts, said the heir-apparent of Denmark in my hearing last night, who should escape whipping? And so, my dear Charles, though I knew when I received your letter, a few moments ago, that it was a great deal more than I deserved, yet I felt much less compunction, I fear, than I ought, and less than I should have felt, if I had not been persuaded that other people were the obje
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
the subject in your letters, or if from Cogswell I could have gained a hint of your wishes, I should have sent but one of them. As it is, your decision cannot be difficult, since in either case it must be proper. Your affectionate child, George Ticknor. To Edward T. Channing. Gottingen, November 16, 1816. Two months ago, my dear Edward, I wrote you from Leipsic, and on my return here found your letters of August 9th and September 14th. I thank you for them, as I do in my heart for . . . . Farewell My respects to your mother. George. The subject of the professorship at Harvard College, opened in the letter to his father, but left unmentioned in this later one to Mr. Channing, was henceforward an important element in Mr. Ticknor's thoughts and plans. It was under discussion for a year, as the length of time necessary for receiving answers to questions and propositions made on opposite sides of the Atlantic prolonged the period of uncertainty. It will not appear agai
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
Chapter 6: Mr. Ticknor leaves Gottingen. Frankfort. Fr. Von Schlegel. Voss. Creuzer. arrival in Paris and residence there. A. W. Von Schlegel. Duke and Duchess de Broglie. Humboldt. Helen Maria Williams. Madame de Stael. sa's,—Frederick von Schlegel, again to my great satisfaction, etc., etc. Baron Gagern reminded me of Jeremiah Mason, Mr. Ticknor, on a visit to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, before he went to Europe, carried a letter of introduction to Mr. Jeremiah Mat Mr. Webster's, when the style of address was quite changed, and he never after regretted knowing Mr. Mason. During Mr. Ticknor's absence in Europe, his journal was for a time in the hands of his friend, Mr. N. A. Haven, of Portsmouth. Mr. Masone genuine French wit, with its peculiar grace and fluency, so completely in his power as M. Pozzo di Borgo; Note by Mr. Ticknor: I have learned since that he is a Corsican. and on my saying this to M. Schlegel, he told me there was nobody equal t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
e will permit. Yours very respectfully, Geo. Ticknor. The comprehensive plan here sketched tablished professorships. When, therefore, Mr. Ticknor thus laid before the President his ideas of the President simply stated these facts to Mr. Ticknor, who writes in reply: This, of course, veryt of my attention to them. For some time Mr. Ticknor suffered from delays in establishing rules adopting one or two verbal changes made by Mr. Ticknor in an interleaved copy. The Lectures on thurtis to Mr. Hillard. and I have both heard Mr. Ticknor lecture before large and mixed audiences ofaid of its treasures, and who received from Mr. Ticknor friendly encouragement and judicious counse The strong religious impressions which Mr. Ticknor received in early years deepened, as his chrs his pastor and friend, wrote a notice of Mr. Ticknor after his death, The article is entitledund among his papers. In December, 1820, Mr. Ticknor joined a party of friends who went to Plymo[2 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
is animated, but regular and quiet winter life, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor turned, as the summer came, toMrs. Ticknor turned, as the summer came, to the pleasant variety of visits to their friends. They passed some weeks at the delightful summer s translated into French. In a letter to Mr. Ticknor dated Paris, March, 1826, General Lafayetteth edition. It was a great enjoyment to Mr. Ticknor to renew in Boston his personal intercoursey. . . . . In a letter of June 11, 1824, Mr. Ticknor speaks of the Baron de Wallenstein, now belled there. In two letters to Mr. Prescott, Mr. Ticknor describes some of the scenes and incidents In the course of this visit in Washington, Mr. Ticknor was asked by General Lafayette to interest soil into the interior of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ticknor said to them, You must furnish me with a wr next day the two documents were brought to Mr. Ticknor, written in correct and fluent Latin. Dr. ture, which he held for five years. In 1826 Mr. Ticknor writes to Mr. Daveis, Our German teacher, D[16 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
n Harvard College. The spirit with which Mr. Ticknor entered on his professorship at Harvard Colrved, and no one did more to create it than Mr. Ticknor. His interest in the improvement of edu For the consideration of these gentlemen Mr. Ticknor had drawn up a paper, the general object and invited and accepted the article-informed Mr. Ticknor that, by the advice of friends, he had deci was an old controversy, recently revived. Mr. Ticknor availed himself of the ample notes from whied from Harvard College, and whose opinions Mr. Ticknor did not share. In the interests of good leege was concerned, of the improvement which Mr. Ticknor had desired to accomplish, it left him freere infused into the affairs of the College, Mr. Ticknor had no longer the same difficulties to contles taught French during all the years that Mr. Ticknor held the professorship; and, having passed professor who appointed and directed them. Mr. Ticknor's purposes, throughout, should be judged by[17 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
zation with the Athenaeum; and of this plan Mr. Ticknor, with his liberal views of the needs of pubn us as truly as you can. Yours always, Geo. Ticknor. Among the friends most valued by Mr. Mr. Ticknor was his college classmate, Sylvanus Thayer, who, having entered the army of the United Statned. Colonel Thayer had repeatedly urged Mr. Ticknor to serve as a member of the Board of Visitoons of the Academy. In the spring of 1826, Mr. Ticknor having expressed his readiness to attend th Very soon after his arrival at West Point, Mr. Ticknor received the sad news of the illness and de among them that this should be prepared by Mr. Ticknor, and a volume was accordingly arranged by hnd of the scene of its delivery, written by Mr. Ticknor, is given in Mr. Curtis's Life of Webster, yful as a kitten. It may be noticed that Mr. Ticknor had already (p. 331) applied to Mr. Websteruses of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Mr. Ticknor was a Director from 1827 to 1835, Vice-Pres[11 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
he next years formed a very happy period in Mr. Ticknor's happy life; for, though checkered like al the time when he formed a home of his own, Mr. Ticknor studied to make it a centre of comfort and the following summer, that of 1828, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor made a trip to Quebec. This was succeeded deeply as he does, I have had some luck. Mr. Ticknor often expressed some regret that he had nev subdued colors in furnishing this library, Mr. Ticknor succeeded in producing the effect he sought Mr. Folsom accompanied me to call upon Mr. Ticknor, the historian of Spanish literature. He hs health. His periods of actual service in Mr. Ticknor's family amounted to twenty years. While th being familiar with the house; and I heard Mr. Ticknor greet him in friendly tones, their scholarls. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have been acquainted, and I mr. affectionate father, 1 o'clock, Friday. Geo. Ticknor. The little boy died on the 4th of Aug[36 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
gves-sels—had an exciting conclusion, which Mr. Ticknor thus describes:— At the moment when, wih and vivid interest of travel began, which Mr. Ticknor could now enjoy, with less regretful longinLord Ossington,—when they all were often at Mr. Ticknor's house. another of the Ministry, who was iKenyon In another passage of the Journal Mr. Ticknor says: Mr. Kenyon is a man of fortune and li, and kind as possible. I went, too, while Mrs. Ticknor was with Mrs. Somerville, to inquire for po with his old friend Whishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but al, where I heard Agassiz When Agassiz and Ticknor became close and faithful friends, a few year One evening, during the meeting in Dublin, Mr. Ticknor heard Dr. Lardner make the well-known discoted the Taylors, Previously mentioned by Mr. Ticknor as Mr. John Taylor, the geologist, and main with his wife and two pleasant daughters. Mr. Ticknor and his family made a short visit, ten days[16 more...
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