hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tilghman, Tench 1744-1786 (search)
Tilghman, Tench 1744-1786 Military officer; born in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 25, 1744; was a merchant before the Revolution; became one of Mercer's Flying Camp as captain of a company of Philadelphia light infantry. In August, 1776, he became Washington's aide and confidential secretary, and remained in that post until the close of the war, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel after April, 1777. He was thoroughly patriotic, and much of the time while with Washington for five years he refused 1777. He was thoroughly patriotic, and much of the time while with Washington for five years he refused pay for his services. He was in every action in which the main army was Samuel J. Tilden. concerned. He was chosen by Washington to bear to Congress at Philadelphia despatches announcing the surrender of Cornwallis. In a letter to General Sullivan in Congress (May 11, 1781), he had highly commended Tilghman as deserving of great consideration. He died in Baltimore, Md., April 18, 1786.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
il his death in June, 1884. Lloyd Tilghman Lloyd Tilghman, brigadier-general in the Confederate States army, was born in Talbot county, Maryland, in 1816. He was of a distinguished colonial family, being the great-grandson of Matthew Tilghman, who was president of the revolutionary conventions of Maryland, member of the legislature and Continental Congress, head of the council of safety, and known in his old age as the Patriarch of Maryland. A daughter of this ancestor married Col. Tench Tilghman, aide-de-camp to General Washington. Lloyd Tilghman was graduated at the United States military academy in 1836, and was commissioned second-lieutenant in the First Dragoons. September 30, 1836, he resigned and took up the profession of civil engineering, becoming division engineer of the Baltimore & Susquehanna railroad in 1836-37; of the Norfolk & Wilmington canal in 1837-38; of the Eastern Shore railroad of Maryland in 1838-39; and of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad in 1839-40. He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Shall Cromwell have a statue? (search)
of the country achieved before he began to direct his efforts toward the creation of a nation, with a central power adequate to a coercive policy if called for by the occasion. Thus, in March, 1783, he wrote to Nathaniel Greene (Ford, Writings of Washington, Vol. X, p. 203, note): It remains only for the States to be wise, and to establish their independence on the basis of an inviolable, efficacious union, and a firm confederation. The following month he wrote in the same spirit to Tench Tilghman (Ib., Vol. X, p. 238): In a word the Constitution of Congress must be competent to the general purposes of Government, and of such a nature as to bind us together. Otherwise we shall be like of sand and as easily broken. Finally, in the circular letter addressed to the governor of all the States on disbanding the army, June 8, 1783 (Ib., Vol. X, p. 257): There are four things which, I humbly conceive, are essential to the well-being, a way, even venture to say, to the existence of
was also taken possession of by orders of the Surveyor. She is entirely owned in South Carolina. Arrest of Gen. Tench Tilghman. The Easton (Md.) Gazette has the following account of the arrest of Gen. Tilghman, of that county: On TGen. Tilghman, of that county: On Thursday last the steamer Pioneer, Captain Norman, on her regular trip from Baltimore to Easton Point, via Cambridge, by direction of Brig. Gen. Lockwood, Lieut. Col. Baily, of the Second Delaware Regiment, in command of companies B and C, Capts. Crer their arrival, Capt. Ricketts, with a guard of ten men, procured a conveyance and proceeded to the residence of Gen. Tench Tilghman, in Oxford Neck, and detained him in arrest. Capt. Ricketts then returned to Easton and delivered him over to Liethe hands of Capt. Knight. Gen. Lockwood will bring the matter before the Government for their action.--We learn that Mrs. Tilghman speaks in high terms of the respectful and gentlemanly deportment of those making the arrest. Prince Napoleon a