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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 31 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Lloyd Tilghman or search for Lloyd Tilghman in all documents.

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give assurances on the part of the South that the neutrality of Kentucky should be respected. This agreement enabled General Buckner to arrest a movement of General Pillow, who was about to seize Columbus, Kentucky, with Tennessee troops. The inhabitants of this commanding site were strongly Southern in feeling, and, under a violent apprehension that their town was in danger, had induced General Pillow to consent to occupy it. He now suspended his movement, and General Buckner placed Colonel Tilghman there, with six companies of the State Guard, with orders to enforce neutrality, give protection to all citizens claiming it, and restrain our own citizens from all acts of lawless aggression. The active partisans on either side were not deceived by the pretense of neutrality. The Federal faction organized the Union Club, a secret society, with ramifications throughout the State, which, backed by the money and patronage of the Government, made converts rapidly; and, to quote Van Hom
l troops, who shift from one post to another, and when moving steal everything that they meet, and take everything valuable that they can carry. This is not an unfair sample of the reported conduct of the Federal troops on this line. Brigadier-General Tilghman, who succeeded Alcorn in command at Hopkinsville, reported, November 2d, that he was threatened by a heavy body of the enemy. He adds that he had 750 sick, and only 285 for duty. To meet a scouting-party of the enemy he raked up a battalion of 400 men, but the surgeon declared that only one-half of them were fit for duty. Tilghman described them as the poorest clad, shod, and armed body of men I ever saw, but full of enthusiasm. Four days later, Gregg reached him, under orders from General Johnston, with 749 Texans, after marches of almost unexampled speed from their homes. Forrest, too, passed to the front on a scout. Such was the condition of affairs in the western district of his department when General Johnston wro
age when the war broke out. Determined to raise a cavalry command, he ventured to Louisville, Kentucky, after the battle of Manassas, and with his own money bought and brought away the arms and equipments requisite to put them in the field. His eight companies numbered 650 men, Alabamians, Tennesseeans, Kentuckians, and Texans — a mixed command. They rendezvoused at Fort Donelson late in October, and, moving thence to Hopkinsville, were thrown forward, about the middle of November, by General Tilghman, commanding there, to observe the section between the Green and Cumberland Rivers. Major Kelly, with one squadron, traversed the country to the Ohio River, where he captured a supply-transport, well loaded. having rejoined Forrest, they attacked the Federal gunboat Conestoga at Canton Landing. The novel sight was there witnessed of a fight between cavalry and a gunboat; the latter belching thunders from nine heavy guns, the former rattling her iron sides with a four-pounder and sh
. firing on the Fort. Tilghman's strength. Tilghman's telegrams. reinforcements sent. Tilghman'nted. On the 17th of November Brigadier-General Lloyd Tilghman, who had been in command at Hopkiven to make all needful requisitions. General Tilghman had been assigned to General Johnston wit Though General Johnston had no objection to Tilghman's promotion, knowing that Polk had previouslynt of the condition of things at Fort Henry. Tilghman had written him, December 28th, before the arman's immediate commander: Urge upon General Tilghman the necessity of immediate attention to tceived throughout January, from both Polk and Tilghman, based on intelligence received through the lested chiefly with the officer in charge, General Tilghman, who had been in immediate command for tweiman, commanding at Fort Henry, and from General Tilghman, during the 4th and 5th of February, breaaged artillerists. Whatever may have been Tilghman's want of earnestness in preparation during t[38 more...]
ckner's command8,000 Pillow's, from Clarksville2,000 Clark's, from Hopkinsville2,000 17,000 To these must be added Polk's reinforcements, not included in Tilghman's returns-1,600 men-making 18,600 men. The generals commanding at Donelson estimated the force there at from 12,000 to 15,000 men. General Brown, General Palmer,e, his own army fell off from 14,000 to 10,000 effectives. At Donelson there were other causes also at work, usual among raw and demoralized recruits. Three of Tilghman's regiments decreased, from January 14th to January 31st, from 2,199 effectives to 1,421, principally from measles ; and in many commands the effective strength id investigation, below the mark. Badeau's Life of Grant, vol. i., p. 36. After leaving the bottom-lands around Fort Henry, a broad, good road, built by Tilghman, passed through a country of hill and valley, thickly wooded, to Donelson. It was sandy, and now dry; and the troops moved swiftly over it in the bracing air of
ely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter from Richmond, to report to General Johnston, and to take command at Columbus. He did not leave Manassas for several days, and probably arrived at Bowling Green about February 5th or 6th. On the 7th he held a conference with Generals Johnston and Hardee, the minutes of which are here given. It will be observed that, on February 4th and 5th, General Johnston was moving troops to Clarksville to support Tilghman, and on the 6th ordered Floyd's entire command thither. General Beauregard remained in Bowling Green until the 12th. His conference with General Johnston did not take place until February 7th, when they both knew of the fall of Fort Henry, and made their plans with reference to that fact. Memorandum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, February 7, 1862. At a meeting held to-day at my quarters (Covington House), by Generals Johns