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Browsing named entities in HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). You can also browse the collection for Tim or search for Tim in all documents.

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ons; married 359 couples; admitted to the church 304 communicants; and officiated at 990 funerals. Every arrangement for a public funeral which respect for their venerable pastor could suggest was made by the town; and their Committee for the occasion were Messrs. Abner Bartlett, Jonathan Brooks, Thatcher Magoun, Turell Tufts, and Dudley Hall. The funeral services were on Saturday, Dec. 14. The prayer was offered by President Kirkland ; and the sermon preached by Dr. Abiel Holmes, from 2 Tim. IV. 6, 7. The pall-bearers were the Rev. Drs. Kirkland and Holmes, of Cambridge; Ripley, of Concord; Foster, of Brighton; Fiske, of West Cambridge ; and Homer, of Newton. The wife of Dr. Osgood died Jan. 7, 1818, aged seventy, and left behind the memorial of an amiable, intelligent, and pious woman. The memory of the just is blessed. The incidents in the history of Dr. Osgood, not mentioned in the memoir, are few and unimportant. Among those of historic interest are the following:-
Medford, for four hundred and four pounds sterling, which he owned at the time of his death. His farm in Medford was bought of Edward Collins, and thus probably a part of the great Cradock estate. He sold his farm in Concord, Oct. 22, 1664; and he died there, May 21, 1667. His wife was Grace----, who died May 12, 1664. His children were--  1-2Joshua, b. freeman, 1652; m. Han. Mason, of Watertown.  3Caleb, b. 1632; freeman, 1654.  4Gershom, freeman, 1672; m. Hannah Eckles.  5Mary, m. Tim. Wheeler, of Concord. (According to Mr. Shattuck, probably others.) 1-3CALEB Brooks lived at Concord until 1679. He m., successively, the two daus. of Thomas Atkinson; viz., Susannah, Apr. 10, 1660; 2d, Hannah. He removed to Medford, where he inherited some land lying east from the Wear Bridge. His house was situated about mid-way between the bridge and the Lowell Railroad, immediately in front of the Woburn Road. It was torn down, in 1779, by his great-grandson, Samuel. He died July