hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Alexis De Tocqueville or search for Alexis De Tocqueville in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
étaient les plus cheres, celle de laemancipation et celle de l Union. The Marquis de Chambrun arrived early in 1865, commended to Sumner by his father-in-law, Baron de Corcelle, The baronment Sumner. July 14, 1866, a lamp from the Roman catacombs, on which was the figure of a shepherd caring for one of his flock, the giver thinking it appropriate to the senator as protector of the blacks. Upon Sumner's death, the lamp came into the possession of his friend, F. W. Bird.—friend of Tocqueville, and at one time French ambassador at Rome, whose acquaintance Sumner had made in Paris. The marquis was from that time a frequent visitor at Sumner's lodgings, and he continued for many years to live in Washington. Sumner, in his testimony in 1872 in the French arms investigation, as also in his speech February 28 of that year (Works, vol. XV. p. 9), spoke of the studies and eminent connections of the marquis. He died in New York in 1891. Agassiz sailed in April, 1865, on his e
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 52: Tenure-of-office act.—equal suffrage in the District of Columbia, in new states, in territories, and in reconstructed states.—schools and homesteads for the Freedmen.—purchase of Alaska and of St. Thomas.—death of Sir Frederick Bruce.—Sumner on Fessenden and Edmunds.—the prophetic voices.—lecture tour in the West.—are we a nation?1866-1867. (search)
in a wide range of reading, beginning with those which antedated the discovery by Columbus, and ending with those of Tocqueville and Cobden, each one accompanied with a sketch of its author. He was led to the research by his conception of a repubspoke first at Pontiac, Mich., where he mentioned, as he began, that just as he left home a friend had put in his hand Tocqueville's A Fortnight in the Wilderness,—an account of the Frenchman's visit to Pontiac in 1831, whither he had gone to find the limits of civilization, and to see how it shaded off into savage life. None of the audience knew before of Tocqueville's visit; but the daughter of the landlord, at whose hotel the French visitor had lodged, speaking to Sumner after the lecture, recalled the strangers whose coming was a mystery. Beaumont was probably with Tocqueville. His lecturing tour extended as far west as St. Louis and Dubuque, and as far north as Milwaukee. The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pont
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
a trustee of the British Museum. I was interested in the efforts of the historian to obtain for Lewis a copy of the works of Saint-Pierre. Four years before I had imported from Paris a complete set,—more than twenty-five volumes. While with Tocqueville I enjoyed touch a visit to the old ancestral home of Saint-Pierre, some five or six miles from Tocqueville, in a thick wood, gridironed with roads and paths. Ante, vol. III. p. 548. This reminds me of your residence at St. Germain in the Tocqueville, in a thick wood, gridironed with roads and paths. Ante, vol. III. p. 548. This reminds me of your residence at St. Germain in the summer of 1858, and of my taking to you Professor Felton, our Grecian just returned from Athens, who seemed to refresh the historian, and came away charmed. He, too, is dead; an admirable scholar. I am glad that your husband declined a title. The simplicity of his life was kept perfect to the end, when Westminster Abbey became his peerage. The John Fiske Since distinguished in studies of American history. whose article is praised so effectively (p. 294) was a young man of twenty-