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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Alexis De Tocqueville or search for Alexis De Tocqueville in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
Austrians; they will be more curious, too, more distinct, more interesting—even, perhaps, more efficient—as individuals; but they will not constitute so efficient a mass, nor one so likely to make permanent progress. Besides, democracy is natural to you; you have always been democrats, and democracy is, therefore, a reality—une veritye—in America. In Europe it is a falsehood, and I hate all falsehood,—En Europe c'est un mensonge. I have always, however, been of the opinion expressed by Tocqueville, that democracy, so far from being the oldest and simplest form of government, as has been so often said, is the latest invented form of all, and the most complicated. With you in America it seems to be un tour de force perpetuel. You are, therefore, often in dangerous positions, and your system is one that wears out fast,— qui s'use vite. I said, A young constitution easily throws off diseases that would destroy life in an old one, etc. True, true, he replied; you will go on
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
h his uprightness, his solid wealth, his science and politics, is quite an admirable person. He reminds me of the old courtier of the queen, and the queen's old courtier, From a song given in Percy Reliques as from the Pepys collection. so completely has he the air of belonging to the best of the old times. But I talked chiefly to-day with De Metz, who is full of intelligence and talent, and one of those able, sound, conscientious magistrates of whom any country may be proud. Like Tocqueville, Julius, and Crawfurd, he returns having changed his opinion about solitary confinement, and now thinks the Philadelphia system preferable to the Auburn. Between nine and ten I took Guizot in my carriage to Mad. de Broglie's, where we had, en tres petit comite, a very gay and brilliant talk, partly political and partly literary, in which the generally degraded tone of French letters at the present time was not spared. On my way home I stopped at the Duchess de Rauzan's, where there
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
the great and good qualities attributed to her. with whom he had been so intimate during his first youthful visit in France. These friends, with their delightful coterie,—Doudan, Villemain, Madame de Ste. Aulaire, M. and Mad. d'haussonville, and others of the Duc de Broglie's family,—renewed the old associations, and there were pleasant dinners in the Faubourg St. Germain, and a breakfast at Mr. Ticknor's hotel. Puibusque, Ternaux-Compans, Mignet, came to find their former friend, and de Tocqueville came repeatedly, during a few days he was in town, and dined once with Mr. Ticknor. Ten days after his arrival in Paris the Count and Countess de Circourt returned, from a journey, to their pretty country-place at La Celle St. Cloud, and there Madame de Circourt, who was then a suffering invalid, received the Ticknors at a charming breakfast alfresco, on a lovely summer day. Count Circourt was constantly a delightful companion in town, breakfasting and dining in the Place Vendome, droppi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
know, is Minister for the Colonies, and she said he came home last night at half past 2, made nearly ill by reading the details of the horrors in India, that were brought by the mail of yesterday. . . . . I dined at Sir George Lewis's,—a dinner given to the Heads, and which the Heads did as much as anybody to make agreeable. Dr. Waagen was there, . . . . fourteen in all. I sat next to Lady Theresa, who talked as brilliantly as ever. She seems never to tire. . . . . Her admiration for Tocqueville seems to know no bounds, and when she found how much we all liked him, she fairly shook hands with me upon it, at table. After we went up stairs, Sir George came and sat down—evidently with a purpose—next to me. . . . . . He wanted to talk about the slavery question, and I went over it with him for nearly two hours, Sir Edmund joining us for the last half-hour, during which we went somewhat upon India, and the difficulty there, as in the United States, of dealing with different races o<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
nor, Susan Perkins, daughter of G T., birth and death of, I. 397. Ticknor, William, grandfather of G. T., I. 5, 6. Tieck, Friedrich, I 495, 504. Tieck, Ludwig, I. 457, 460, 462, 468, 469, 472, 473. 475, 477, 481, 482, 483, 485, 491, 503, II. 334, 480 and note; library of, 250; letter from, 260. Tiedge, C. F., I. 474, 475, 482, II. 334. Tiernay, George, I. 263. Tintoretto, I. 163. Titian's Assumption, I. 163. Tobin, Sir, John, I. 425. Tocca, Chevalier, I. 175. Tocqueville, Alexis de, I. 421 and note, 458, II. 355, 361, 362, 364, 366, 369, 371, 385. Tolken, Professor, I. 497. Tommaseo, Niccolo, II. 138, 139 and note. Torlonia, Duchess, II. 62. Torlonia, Prince, II. 67. Torrigiani, Marchese Carlo de, II. 52. Totten, General, I. 375. Tourgueneff, Alexander, II 101, 117, 120, 125, 130. Tourgueneff, N., II. 125. Tremenheere, Hugh Seymour, II 274 and note. Trench, Dean (Archbishop), II. 358, 363, 364. Trenton Falls, visits, I. 386. Trev