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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 116 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 67 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 65 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 46 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Robert Toombs or search for Robert Toombs in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
bson; 1st N. C., Col. M. S. Stokes (k), Capt. H. A. Brown, Lieut.-Col. William P. Bynum; 3d N. C., Col. Gaston Meares (k), Lieut.-Col. William L. De Rosset. Brigade loss: k, 171; w, 707; m, 30==908. Artillery: Va. Battery (Hanover Arty.), Capt. (G. W. Nelson. (See, also, Jones's Battalion in Reserve Artillery, temporarily attached to this division.) Magruder's command, Maj.-Gen. J. B. Magruder. Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Col. Edgar M. Butt (w), Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William M. Mcintosh (m w), Lieut.-Col. William T. Millican, Maj. T. J. Smith, Capt. S. Z. Hearnsberger; 17th Ga., Col. Henry L. Benning; 20th Ga., Col. J. B. Cumming. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 380; m, 6 == 430. Third Brigade, Col. George T. Anderson: 1st Ga. (regulars), Col. William J. Magill; 7th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. W. White (w), Maj . E. W. Hoyle (w), Capt. George H. Carmical; 8th Ga., Col. L. M. Lamar (
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
rite or to collect my thoughts. The battle at Glendale on the 30th of June, the next day after that of Savage's Station, was saved by my brigade, which kept the enemy from piercing the center of the Army of the Potomac; but, like the instance above, history has given the credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Lieutenant Barry's 32-pounder rifled gun mounted on a rail-car, and protected from cannon-shot by a sloping roof, in front, covered with plates of iron, through which a port-hole had been pierced. Editors. was over, our troops held
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
his support his own division, and that part of Ewell's which was in reserve; but owing to the increasing darkness, and the intricacy of the forest and swamp, they did not arrive in time to render the desired assistance. Hill was therefore compelled to abandon part of the ground that he had gained, after suffering severe loss and inflicting heavy damage upon the enemy. I never saw anything more grandly heroic than the advance after sunset of the nine brigades under Magruder's orders. Toombs's brigade belonged to Magruder, but had moved to my assistance by my order when we were hard pressed. It was not, therefore, in the final attack made by Magruder.--D. H. H. Unfortunately, they did not move together, and were beaten in detail. As each brigade emerged from the woods, from fifty to one hundred guns opened upon it, tearing great gaps in its ranks; but the heroes reeled on and were shot down by the reserves at the guns, which a few squads reached. Most of them had an open fiel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
ss. k, 38; w, 196 = 234. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 44th Ala.,-----; 3d Ga.,-----; 22d Ga.,-----; 48th Ga.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 32; w, 150; m, 8 = 190. Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Staff loss: m, 1. Toombs's Brigade, Col. Henry L. Benning, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican; 17th Ga., Maj. John H. Pickett (w), Capt. A. C. Jones (k), Capt. Hiram L. French; 20th Ga.,Maj. J. D. Waddell. Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican; 17th Ga., Maj. John H. Pickett (w), Capt. A. C. Jones (k), Capt. Hiram L. French; 20th Ga.,Maj. J. D. Waddell. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 327 = 367. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 50th Ga.,-----; 51st Ga.,-----; 15th S. C.,-----; Phillips's (Ga.) Legion, . Brigade loss: k, 13; w, 80=93. Jones's Brigade, Col. George T. Anderson: 1st Ga. (regulars), Maj. John D. Walker; 7th Ga., Col. W. T. Wilson (m w), 8th Ga., Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers; 9th Ga., Col. Benjamin Beck; 11th Ga., Lieut.-Col. William Luffman. Brigade loss: k, 103; w, 701; m, 5 = 809. Wilcox's division, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
rapid gallop, singing as loud as he could, Jine the cavalry. General Toombs, our Georgia fire-eater, was given to criticising pretty severeat point of escape. The work was assigned to the command under General Toombs, who was absent at the time. He had met a kindred spirit in th to have their friends with them. In going back to his command General Toombs came upon his troops on the road and inquired what they were doing there. The explanation was made. Toombs had had a good dinner and felt independent. He said he would give the general to understand tha marched solemnly back, the matter was reported to me and I ordered Toombs under arrest. As we marched against Pope I allowed him to ride witjoin his command. As we were preparing for the charge at Manassas, Toombs arrived. He was riding rapidly, with his hat in his hand, and was enthusiasm, and, everything being ready, an exultant shout was sent up, and the men sprang to the charge. I had no more trouble with Toombs.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. (search)
m I have recently corresponded. They say, 10 A. M., and the woods were full of the enemy's troops at 11 o'clock. General Lee's headquarters during the 29th and 30th were on the elevation between Pageland lane and Meadowville lane [see p. 473], a few hundred yards west of us. When he moved on the 31st, the band stopped and played Dixie for us in good old Southern style. William R. Houghton, attorney-at-law, of Hayneville, Alabama, writes to the editors as follows: I belonged to Toombs's brigade of D. R. Jones's division, and we were ready to march from the eastern end of Thoroughfare Gap at daylight on the morning of the 29th of August, but other troops filing past occupied the road, so that we did not move until a little after sunrise. We moved at a quick pace, without halting, until we filed to the right of the road near Groveton. My recollection of the distance we marched is that it was eight or nine miles. At the time of our arrival some of Longstreet's troops who h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
e political speakers of 1860 a number might be mentioned who afterward served, in some cases with distinction, in the respective armies; for example, Banks, Baker, Frank P. Blair, Jr., Logan, Garfield, Schurz, on the Union side; and Breckinridge, Toombs, Cobb, Floyd, and Pryor of the Confederates.--Editors. The battle of South Mountain was one of extraordinary illusions and delusions. The Federals were under the self-imposed illusion that there was a very large force opposed to them, whereaf Drayton, Pickett, Jenkins, G. T. Anderson, and Kemper; and 3 belonging to an extemporized division of N. G. Evans, including the brigades of Evans, Hood, and Law. On page 886, Part I., Volume XIX. of the Official Records, Jones says that after Toombs joined him from Hagerstown, his 6 brigades numbered at Sharpsburg 2430 men; i. e., an average of 405 men to each brigade. Now all Longstreet's officers and men know that the ranks were fuller at Sharpsburg than at South Mountain, because there w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
: k, 48; w, 285; m, 49 = 382. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 44th Ala.,----3d Ga.,----; 22d Ga.,----; 48th Ga.,----. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 32; w, 192; m, 34 = 258. Artillery, Maj. J. S. Saunders: La. Battery (Donaldsville Art'y), Capt. Victor Maurin; Va. Battery (Huger's); Va. Battery, Lieut. C. R. Phelps; Va. Battery (Thompson's or Grimes's). (Loss of artillery not separately reported.) Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Toombs's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. Toombs (in temporary command of a division), Col. Henry L. Benning: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes (k), Maj. Skidmore Harris (w); 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican (k); 17th Ga., Capt. J. A. McGregor; 20th Ga., Col. John B. Cumming. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 16; w, 122; in, 22 = 160. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga.,----; 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 82; w, 280; m, 179 = 541
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
ill which is now the National Cemetery. K.--Toombs (of Longstreet) had defended the lower bridge an and Scammon to the fords below. L.--Then Toombs hurried south to protect the Confederate flanks the Burnside Bridge and gained the heights. Toombs was driven away from the fords. M.--After 3led till he was assigned to a larger command. Toombs's brigade was placed in advance, occupying thef shot and shell from the Confederate cannon. Toombs speaks in his report in a characteristic way oont of eight men at most. But the front which Toombs deployed behind his defenses was three or fourd in the Antietam, he would come up in rear of Toombs, and either the whole of D. R. Joneses division would have to advance to meet Rodman, or Toombs must abandon the bridge. In this I certainly concit takes to tell it, the bridge was passed and Toombs's brigade fled through the woods and over the stream had no doubt made the final struggle of Toombs's men less obstinate than it would otherwise h[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
way and concentrate at Sharpsburg. To that note I got no answer, and the next morning I marched as directed, leaving General Toombs, as ordered by General Lee, at Hagerstown to guard our trains and supplies. We marched as hurriedly as we could ovces, who relieved ]Hood, were extended to our left, reaching well back toward the Potomac, where most of our cavalry was. Toombs had joined us with two of his regiments, and was placed as guard on the bridge on my right. Hooker, who had thrown his cWe are here to die. Meantime General Lee was over toward our right, where Burnside was trying to cross to the attack. Toombs, who had been assigned as guard at that point, Roulette's farm. 1.--View of William Roulette's farm-house. 2.--Roulo meet the Ninth Corps. The little band fought bravely, but the Federals were pressing them slowly back. The delay that Toombs caused saved that part of the battle, however, for at the last moment A. P. Hill came in to reinforce him, and D. H. Hill
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