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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 196 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 48 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 26 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Round Top or search for Round Top in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
right rested on Culp Hill and curved around westerly to Cemetery Hill, and thence extended southerly in a straight line along what is known as Cemetery Ridge to Round Top. This line was well protected along its whole length with either fortifications, stone walls or entrenchments. It was crowned with batteries, while the infantryne was like a shepherd's crook. Our line extended from the enemy's right around to Seminary Ridge, which runs parallel to Cemetery Ridge, to a point opposite to Round Top. Between these two ridges lay an open, cultivated valley of about one mile wide, and through this valley ran the Emmittsburg road in a somewhat diagonal line, wderly as if they were on parade. No sooner than our lines came in full view, the enemy's batteries in front, on the right and on the left, from Cemetery Hill to Round Top, opened on them with a concentrated, accurate and fearful fire of shell and solid shot. These plowed through or exploded in our ranks, making great havoc. Yet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
fishhook, and extend a thin line from the left, before Culp's hill, by the town and away off to the head of the hook at Round Top. The Second day. There can be no question that General Lee intended to attack very early in the morning of the set at 4 P. M., Longstreet's attack broke up this conference. General Law, on the right of Hood, urged the occupation of Round Top, his couriers finding the Federal flank unprotected. Three times it was urged. But Longstreet's reply was General Leettysburg, overwhelming Sickles with his tremendous attack. But if he had heeded Hood and Law, he would also have taken Round Top, and probably have occupied the Tarrytown road, in rear of Meade's army. And the opportunity of the second day was losFederal artillery wore away the left of the attacking force, and a Vermont brigade charged upon its right. The guns on Round Top enfiladed the line. When Pickett's men reached one hundred yards from the wall, the Federal line broke to the rear. T