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nding the enemy's position on the North Anna stronger than either of his previous ones, I withdrew on the night of the twenty-sixth to the north bank of the North Anna, and moved, via Hanoverton, to turn the enemy's position by his right. Generals Torbert and Merritt's divisions of cavalry, under Sheridan, and the Sixth corps led the advance; crossed the Pamunkey river at Hanoverton after considerable fighting, and on the twenty-eighth the two divisions of cavalry had a severe but successful partment and the Departments of West Virginia, Washington and Susquehanna were constituted into the Middle military division, and Major-General Sheridan was assigned to temporary command of the same. Two divisions of cavalry, commanded by Generals Torbert and Wilson, were sent to Sheridan from the Army of the Potomac. The first reached him at Harper's Ferry about the eleventh of August. His operations during the month of August and the fore part of September were both of an offensive and
ed on heights in the centre, and on rising ground in the rear. Heavy artillery duelling began in the early morning, and was continued at intervals, with occasional musketry skirmishing, during the day. About noon a rather vigorous demonstration was made against our centre, and repelled by a portion of the Fifth corps, and a battery which obtained position in the woods. Reconnoissances in the afternoon discovered that the main body of the enemy had fallen back some distance. The news of Torbert's successful engagement with Fitz Hugh Lee's cavalry at Todd's tavern, and the general success of our cavalry in clearing all roads to the front and left, was refreshingly told during the day. General Grant mounted one of his splendid horses at headquarters and made a partial tour along the lines. General Sedgwick and his staff, weary with incessant marching and fighting, lounged under some bushes by the Germania plank-road side. General Grant rode up. General Sedgwick went out to meet
ermined and stubborn fighting, and with the loss of a large number of brave officers and men. Our operations have been entirely on the flank and rear of Lee's army; so much so that I have had no opportunity of sending you any despatches hitherto, but will now endeavor to give you as full an account as possible of all our doings since we crossed the Rapidan. The cavalry corps is composed of three divisions, and numbered at the time we crossed the river several thousand mounted men. General Torbert, commanding the First division, was taken sick, being entirely disabled by an abscess in his back, so that the command of his division had to be given to General Merritt. Brigadier-General D. McM. Gregg commands the Second division, and General J. H. Wilson, recently of the Cavalry Bureau, the Third. Each division had two batteries, numbering in all about thirty guns. On the morning of Wednesday, May fourth, General Gregg's division crossed the Rapidan at Ely's ford, driving in and
protects our right flank, covering the roads toward Hanover Court-house. and Torbert's and Gregg's our left, covering the roads from Richmond east of Tolopotomy cr. On our side the three brigades of Gregg's division and Merritt's brigade of Torbert's division and two light batteries were engaged. The fight occurred on the grPamunkey, to a point known as Old Church Tavern cross-roads, which was held by Torbert's division of our cavalry. They drove in our pickets, and attacked the main line formed in the meantime, but yielded to the first charge made by Torbert's men. They were driven back in confusion, and pursued two miles to the vicinity of Colthe army; the division of Wilson on the right flank; the division of Gregg and Torbert on the left. No serious impression having been produced on the enemy's line of place. I have already mentioned that the cavalry divisions of Gregg and Torbert had been placed so as to cover the left of our line, held by Warren, from whos
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
e via Meadow bridge, and the other through Mechanicsville toward Richmond. It rests to-night within twelve miles of the rebel capital. Wilson's division of cavalry protects our right flank, covering the roads toward Hanover Court-house. and Torbert's and Gregg's our left, covering the roads from Richmond east of Tolopotomy creek. The trains are all safely parked on both banks of the Pamunkey. The movement from the North Anna to the Pamunkey occupied only about forty hours. In that timethe enemy appeared in our front to-day. The encounter of our cavalry with Fitz Hugh Lee's and Hampton's commands on Friday afternoon was most creditable to our arms. On our side the three brigades of Gregg's division and Merritt's brigade of Torbert's division and two light batteries were engaged. The fight occurred on the ground held by our main line to day, and the right and left of the Hanovertown and Richmond road. The enemy, it seems, were fighting to retain possession of a cross-r
As soon as this information was obtained, Torbert was ordered to move quickly, via the toll gat Creek, Va., August 16, 1864. To Brigadier-General A. T. A. Torbert, Chief of Cavalry, Middle MilitaWinchester about sundown, and driving out General Torbert, who was left there with Wilson and Lowelixth corps, and a strong force of the enemy. Torbert, with Wilson's and Merritt's cavalry, was ord of cavalry was ordered to Port Republic, and Torbert to Staunton and Waynesboro to destroy the bri to Port Republic, after which he fell back. Torbert this day took possession of Waynesboro, and p Port Republic to open communication with General Torbert, but on the same night was directed to leered the whole of the cavalry force under General Torbert to accompany me to Front Royal, from whentt's and Custer's divisions of cavalry, under Torbert, and General Getty's division of the Sixth cohief of Staff. On December nineteenth General Torbert, with Merritt and Powell's division, was [24 more...]