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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 29 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Charles T. Torrey or search for Charles T. Torrey in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
r. Garrison in his sonnet to Elizabeth Pease (Lib. 12.4). Colver was efficiently seconded by Torrey, temporarily Lib. 11.11; Ms. Mar. 2, 1841, J. A. Collins to W. L. G. Lib. 11.23, 55, 79; 14: 3141, E. Pease to Collins. priestly candor and magnanimity proved more injurious than Colver's and Torrey's combined defamation, and caused great temporary damage abroad. Colver's effrontery was equaon to cut off free discussion, that led to the introduction of the Bible test by Colver, Phelps, Torrey, St. Clair, etc. These disorganizers and defamers resorted to this device merely to make capital It was a poor rule that would not work both ways, and the identification of Noyes with Phelps, Torrey, and Colver on the woman question was sufficient to prove that these clergymen, therefore, thoug: 94). In December he went to Washington as a newspaper correspondent (Lib. 12: 10; Memoir of C. T. Torrey, p. 87). Those who are curious as to other leading new organizationists will find the above l
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
oodell, in an address to the political abolitionists of the State, read at the above convention. Mr. Garrison gave up a whole page of the Liberator to it; so did Torrey Lib. 12.173. of his Tocsin of Liberty, Published at Albany, N. Y., Torrey being at this time the salaried editor. The name of the paper was subsequently chaTorrey being at this time the salaried editor. The name of the paper was subsequently changed to Albany Patriot ( Memoir of Torrey, p. 104). with this emphatic endorsement: The simple truth is, the American A. S. Society has linked itself to pro-slavery, to get friends—and, like the Colonization Society, it has become an obstacle in the way of progress which must be removed. I trust the address will do the work in thTorrey, p. 104). with this emphatic endorsement: The simple truth is, the American A. S. Society has linked itself to pro-slavery, to get friends—and, like the Colonization Society, it has become an obstacle in the way of progress which must be removed. I trust the address will do the work in this State. We have too much to do to allow us to maintain a long contest over so slight a matter. Lib. 12.173. It seemed desirable to meet this Liberty Party manifesto by sending Mr. Garrison to Central and Western New York, which was virgin soil in his experience, whether as a lecturer or a tourist. He had, since June came
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
aper. Mr. Garrison's physical condition and various distractions during the past two years had confirmed his native habit of procrastination, and laid him open to friendly criticism: Edmund Quincy to W. L. Garrison. Dedham, November 6, 1843. Ms. I have sent in to you my concluding article on Leavitt, See the whole series of articles, discussing anew the embezzlement of the Emancipator, in which Quincy had the help of D. L. Child, and compelled notice at the hands of Leavitt, Torrey, Elizur Wright, and Lewis Tappan (Lib. 13: 165, 169, 170, 171, 174, 179, 185, 201). The Whig papers eagerly copied the attacks on their Liberty Party opponents, who all in turn had a hearing in the Liberator, though Quincy's arraignments were carefully excluded from the Emancipator (Ms. Nov. 27, 1843, Quincy to R. D. Webb). which Lib. 13.179. I hope will meet with your gracious approbation. This, I Joshua Leavitt. presume, will terminate my editorial labors for the present, and I gladly
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
5.115, 132. for slave-stealer—lucky to escape at length with his life. There was also the Rev. Charles T. Torrey, who, two years before, being a newspaper correspondent in Washington, had exercised hional right to visit Annapolis to report a slaveholders' convention, was Jan. 12, 1842; Life of Torrey, pp. 91-104; Lib. 12.10, 14. recognized, nearly lynched, and, upon his room at the tavern being dous attempts to run slaves off from the border States, and in June, 1844, he was again Life of Torrey, p. 126; Lib. 14.107, 119. in a Maryland jail—this time in Baltimore—on a charge that shut out eublic sympathy and indignation. He Lib. 14.126. was as good as his word. On August 19, 1844, Torrey wrote from Baltimore jail to Elias Smith, A former Methodist minister, at this time an anti-sight make a few leaders loath to acknowledge. Compare the letter to Elias Smith cited above. Torrey was well-advised, considering how far his old associates lagged behind the Garrisonian abolition<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
the American Anti-Slavery Society. As the above letter shows, he was fully alive to the possibilities of the occasion, and perfectly tranquil in mind. He could well trust his general appearance to belie the Herald's caricature of him, physically and spiritually; but as he was to be the central figure of the meetings, he was resolved to avoid all outward singularity. For this reason he abandoned for good the turn-down collar which he had clung to through all the changes of fashion, See Torrey's portrait, ante, 1.1, and the frontispiece to the present volume. Mr. Garrison related this incident to his son William. and put on the stand — up collar of the day. Surrounded on the platform by the flower of the Massachusetts Board and by the speakers agreed upon, he entered calmly upon his duties to the Society and to the vast assembly about him. In front, he saw a most respectable company of men and women; behind and above him he felt the organized and impending mob. The passages wh