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James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Isaac Toucey or search for Isaac Toucey in all documents.

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rritory, through their appropriate representatives, may, if they see fit, prohibit the existence of Slavery therein. This touchstone of the true nature and intent of the measure was most decisively voted down; the Yeas and Nays being as follows: Yeas — Fessenden and Hamlin, of Maine; Sumner, of Massachusetts; Foot, of Vermont; Smith, of Connecticut; Fish and Seward, of New York; Chase and Wade, of Ohio; Dodge (Henry), of Wisconsin--10. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodhead, of Pennsylvania; Clayton, of Delaware; Stuart, Gen. Cass, the inventor of Popular Sovereignty, who was in his seat and voted just before, did not respond to the call of his name on this occasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Pratt, of Maryland; Badger, of North Carolina; Butler and Evans, of South Carolina; Dawson, of Georgia; Fitzpatrick
tions will be maintained. The Convention now proceeded to ballot for President, having first adopted, by a vote of 141 to 112, the rule requiring two-thirds of a full Convention to nominate. Candidates were put in nomination, and, on the first ballot, Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois, received 145 1/2 votes; Robert M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, 42 votes; James Guthrie, of Kentucky, 35 votes; Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, 12; Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York, 7; Joseph Lane, of Oregon, 6; Isaac Toucey, of Connecticut, 2 1/2; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, 1 1/2; Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, 1. On the next ballot, Mr. Douglas had 147; and lie continued to gain slowly to the thirty-second, when he received 152 1/2 votes. He fell off on the thirty-sixth to 151 1/2, which vote he continued to receive up to the fifty-seventh ballot, on which Guthrie received 65 1/2, Hunter 16, Lane 14, Dickinson 4, and Jefferson Davis 1. The Convention (May 3d), on motion of Mr. Russell, of Virgi
he Fugitive Slave Law, 212. Thompson, George, 127. Tipton, Mo., Gen. Fremont is visited by Gen. Cameron and suite at, 590. Titus, Col., of Fla., a Border Ruffian, 243. Tod, Gov. David, of Ohio, chosen President of the Douglas Convention, 318. Tompkins. Lieut. C. H., dashes into Fairfax, 533. Toombs, Robert, of Ga., 382: his dispatch to Georgia, 384; 88; a member of Davis's Cabinet, 429. Topeka, Kansas, Free-State Convention at, 240; the Legislature at, dispersed, 244. Toucey, Isaac, in the Dem. Convention, 317. Townsend, Col. F., at Little Bethel, 529-30. Travis, Col., put to death in Texas, 150. Trenholm, Mr., of S. C., offers resolves favoring cooperation, 313-4. Trent, the, Mason and Slidell abstracted from, 606; Secretary Welles on the seizure, 606; Great Britain's course, 607-8. Trescott, Wm. H., Garnett's letter to, 479-80. Troup, Gov., of Ga., sympathizes with the Nullifiers, 100; his treatment of the Indians, 103. True American, The,