Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. D. Townsend or search for E. D. Townsend in all documents.

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that the same be cooked and put in the haversacks of the men. The subsistence stores now in the possession of each division, with the fresh beef that can be drawn from the chief commissary, must last to include the 23d instant. By command of Brigadier-General McDowell. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Commanders of Divisions and Brigades. General McDowell's report. Headquarters, Department Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Va., August 4, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C. Colonel:--I have the honor to submit the following report of the battle of the 21st of July, near Manassas, Virginia. It has been delayed till this time from the inability of the subordinate commanders to get earlier a true account of the state of their commands. In my communication to you of the 20th ult., I stated it as my intention to move that afternoon, and drive the enemy from the east side of
d not let his troops fall into the ambuscades against which they have been especially forewarned. Let speculation, which to-morrow's news must outstrip, cease here, and let us examine the composition of the forces actually engaged with the Confederates. The head of the naval and military forces of the United States is the President, in theory and in the practice of appointments; but Lieut.-Gen. Winfield Scott is Commander-in-chief of the United States Army. His staff consists of Lieut.-Col. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of the Staff; Col. H. Van Renssellaer, A. D. C. (Volunteer;) Lieut.-Col. George W. Cullum, United States Engineer, A. D. C.; Lieut.-Col. Edward Wright, United States Cavalry, A. D. C.; Lieut.-Col. Schuyler Hamilton, Military Secretary. The subjoined general order gives the organization of the standard of the several divisions of the army under Brig.-Gen. McDowell, now advancing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. For this order
Doc. 84.-battle of Rich Mountain, Va. Gen. McClellan's official report. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Rich Mountain, Va., 9 a.m., July 12, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend: We are in possession of all the enemy's works up to a point in the right of Beverly. I have taken all his guns, a very large amount of wagons, tents, &c.--everything he had — a large number of prisoners, many of whom were wounded, and several officers prisoners. They lost many killed. We have lost, in all, perhaps twenty killed and fifty wounded, of whom all but two or three were in the column under Rosecrans, which turned the position. The mass of the enemy escaped through the woods, entirely disorganized. Among the prisoners is Dr. Taylor, formerly of the army. Col. Pegram was in command. Colonel Rosecrans's column left camp yesterday morning, and marched some eight miles through the mountains, reaching the turnpike some two or three miles in rear of the enemy, defeating an advanced post,
Doc. 85.-McClellan's Second report. Beverly, July 12th, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C,: The success of to-day is all that I could desire. We captured six brass cannons, of which one is rifled, all the enemy's camp equipage and transportation, even to his cups. The number of tents will probably reach two hundred, and more than sixty wagons. Their killed and wounded will amount to fully one hundred and fifty, with one hundred prisoners, and more coming in constantly. I know already of ten officers killed and prisoners. Their retreat is complete. I occupied Beverly by a rapid march. Garnett abandoned his camp early in the morning, leaving much of his equipage. He came within a few miles of Beverly, but our rapid march turned him back in great confusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowl
Doc. 87.-Colonel Pegram's surrender. July 12, 1861. Gen. McClellan's report to Lieut.-Gen. Scott. Headquarters, Beverly, Va., July 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C.:-- I have received from Col. Pegram propositions for the surrender, with his officers and remnant of his command — say six hundred men. They are said to be extremely penitent, and determined never again to take up arms against the General Government. I shall have near nine hundred or one thousand prisoners to take care of when Col. Pegram comes in. The latest accounts make the loss of the rebels in killed some one hundred and fifty. G. B. McClellan, Major-General Department of Ohio. The following correspondence preceded the capitulation: near Tygart's valley River, six miles from Beverly, July 12, 1861. To Commanding Officer of Northern Forces, Beverly, Va.: sir: I write to state to you that I have, in consequence of the retreat of General Garnett, and the jaded and reduced condi
Doc. 88.-General McClellan's report. Huttonsville, Va., July 14, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Ass't Adjutant-General: General Garnett and his forces have been routed and his baggage and one gun taken. His army are completely demoralized. General Garnett was killed while attempting to rally his forces at Carrackford, near St. George. We have completely annihilated the enemy in Western Virginia. Our loss is but thirteen killed and not more than forty wounded, while the enemy's loss is not far from two hundred killed, and the number of prisoners we have taken will amount to at least one thousand. We have captured seven of the enemy's guns in all. A portion of Garnett's forces retreated, but I look for their capture by General Hill, who is in hot pursuit. The troops that Garnett had under his command are said to be the crack regiments of Eastern Virginia, aided by Georgians, Tennesseeans and Carolinians. Our success is complete, and I firmly believe that secessi
Doc. 98.-Occupation of Fairfax Court House, Va. General McDowell's despatch. Fairfax Court House, July 17, 1861. Colonel E. D. Townsend, Headquarters of the Army at Washington:-- we have occupied Fairfax Court House, and driven the enemy towards Centreville and Manassas. We have an officer and three men slightly wounded. The enemy's flight was so precipitate that he left in our hands a quantity of flour, fresh beef, intrenching tools, hospital furniture, and baggage. I endeavored to pursue beyond Centreville, but the men were too much exhausted to do so. Most respectfully yours, Irwin McDowell, Brigadier-GeneraL New York times narratives. Fairfax Court House, Va., Wednesday, July 17, 1861. Here we are — in peaceable possession of Fairfax Court House, without a fight and in hot pursuit of a flying foe. The column will move on as soon as the others come up, and probably encamp at Centreville to-night, within eight miles of Manassas Junction, at which poin
Doc. 103.-General McDowell's despatch. Fairfax Court House, July 18, 1861. To Colonel E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington:-- The First Division, under General Tyler, is between Germantown and Centreville. The Second (Hunter's) is at this place, just about to move forward to Centreville. The Fifth (Miles') is at the crossing of the old Braddock road with the road from this to Fairfax Station, and is ordered forward to Centreville by the old Braddock road. Barry's battery has joined it. One of Colonel Heintzelman's brigades (Wilcox) is at Fairfax Station. Colonel Heintzelman and his other brigade are below the station, but he has not reported to me since we have been here, and I have not been able to communicate with him. I think they are at Sangster's Station. The four men wounded yesterday belonged to Colonel Miles' division, who had some slight skirmishing in reaching the position. Each column encountered about the same obstructions — trees felled a
ms, traitors, or spies, and arrests of of fenders, in such matters, shall only be made in any department by the special authority of the commander thereof, excepting in extreme cases admitting of no delay. By command of Lieut. Gen. Scott. E. D. Townsend, Asst. Adjt.-Gen. General orders no. 13.Headquarters of the army, Washington, July 31, 1861. It has been the prayer of every patriot that the tramp and din of civil war might at least spare the precincts within which repose the sacred nd prosperity — are prepared to trample on the ashes of him to whom we are all mainly indebted for those mighty blessings. Should the operations of war take the United States troops in that direction, the General-in-Chief does not doubt that each and every man will approach with due reverence and leave uninjured, not only the Tomb, but also the House, the Groves, and Walks which were so loved by the best and greatest of men. By command: Winfield Scott. E. D. Townsend, Asst. Adjt.-Gen.
Doc. 175.-battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo. this battle is variously known as that of Wilson's Creek, Springfield, and oak hill. General Fremont's report. Headquarters Western Department, St. Louis, August 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend:-- Gen. Lyon, in three columns, under himself, Siegel, and Sturgis, attacked the enemy at half-past 6 o'clock on the morning of the 10th instant, nine miles south-east of Springfield. The engagement was severe. Our loss is about eight hundred killed and wounded. General Lyon was killed in a charge at the head of his column. Our force was eight thousand, including two thousand Home Guards. The muster roll reported to have been taken from the enemy gives their force at 23,000, including regiments from Louisiana, Tennessee, and Mississippi, with Texan Rangers and Cherokee half-breeds. This statement is corroborated by prisoners. The enemy's loss is reported to have been heavy, including Generals McCulloch and Price. Their tents and wag
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