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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 21 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Walter Trevelyan or search for Walter Trevelyan in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
Chapter 5: Florence. Pisa. Lucca. Milan. Venice. passes of the Alps. Wordsworth. Heidelberg. A slow and lingering journey from Rome to Florence, by the Perugia route, in exquisite spring weather, could not be otherwise than delightful, and in Perugia Mr. and Mrs. Trevelyan added a zest to every pleasure by their presence. Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor reached Florence on the 5th of May, and left it on the 20th. Florence, May 6.—. . . . Having letters to them, I gave the evening to the Bonapartes. Louis—Count of St. Leu-lives in a good palazzo, Lunga Arno. I was received by two gentlemen in waiting, and found him in his salon; a fat, plethoric, easy old gentleman, nearly a fixture in his elbow-chair. He talked well enough, and very good-naturedly, about everything except French politics, in relation to which he was bitter, and accused the present government of a want of bonne foi et loyaute, accusations which sounded oddly from one of his name and kindred. Several
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
ed on for Northumberland, . . . . arriving at our old friend Sir Walter Trevelyan's just as twilight was closing in. He lives about twelve milNorthumberland, beginning with the building of the Roman wall. Lady Trevelyan is painting the spaces between the pictures with native plants, and interesting to me, and which, with his talk about them and Lady Trevelyan's, made the time seem very short. . . . . She is as active-mind 17.—After spending a couple of hours in the library, I went with Trevelyan to see his gardens and greenhouses, half a mile off, and, as he tthat come to the table. Declining a drive, . . . . I walked with Trevelyan to one of his villages, and went into some of the houses, which Ie thought them to be good New-Englanders. . . . . August 18.—Lady Trevelyan was at work this morning on the plants with which she is ornamectly appointed, and in admirable order. The house is as large as Trevelyan's, and not unlike it; and he, a young bachelor, can occupy only a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
ent a week with us at New Year, and again, only yesterday, with Cogswell, who, after spending three or four days with us, went to New York this morning. The two Annas and Lizzie send love. So do I. So do Prescott and Hillard, to whom I gave your messages, and so does Savage, to whom you sent none. Always yours, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Walter Calverly Trevelyan. Boston, U. S. A., June 28, 1859. my dear Sir Walter,—. . . . Hillard Then visiting England, and introduced to Sir Walter Trevelyan by Mr. Ticknor. can tell you all you will want to know about this country . . . . On the Maine Liquor Law, which interests you so much, and which, if it were possible to execute it honestly, would interest me equally, he knows at least as much as I do. But I rather think his opinion is substantially like mine; namely, that it has not advanced the cause of temperance among us, and that it has tended much to bring all laws into disrepute which are not in themselves popular . . . . . It
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
Chapter 24: 1867 to 1870. letters to Sir E. Head, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir Walter Trevelyan, the King of Saxony, G. T. Curtis, General Thayer. To Sir Edmund Head, London. Boston, February 21, 1867. my dear Head,—I am surprised to find that I sent you no answer about the meaning of El moron in the ballad of Blanca sois, Señora Mia. To be sure, I had no doubt but that it meant the horse, as soon as you gave me the suggestion of Mrs. Marshall, and I rather think that we ought both of us to feel a little mortified that we needed the lady's hint. And, to be sure, further I can say in reply to your question, that I do not remember any other case in which the name of the color is put for the horse, although I will bet a penny I ought to recollect cases in which pardo, bayo, etc., are so used. But is not Sancho's ass just as good as any horse in the world, and just as classical, and is he not called el rucio fifty times in Don Quixote? And now I am in the way of c
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Totten, General, I. 375. Tourgueneff, Alexander, II 101, 117, 120, 125, 130. Tourgueneff, N., II. 125. Tremenheere, Hugh Seymour, II 274 and note. Trench, Dean (Archbishop), II. 358, 363, 364. Trenton Falls, visits, I. 386. Trevelyan, Mr. (Sir Walter Calverly), II. 65, 72, 73, 87, 393, 394, 395; letters to, 420, 485. Trevelyan, Mrs. (Lady), II. 66, 72, 73, 87, 394, 395. Trist, Mr. and Mrs., I. 348. Trotter, Hon. Mrs., II 148. Trotti, Marchese and Marchesa, II. 95, Trevelyan, Mrs. (Lady), II. 66, 72, 73, 87, 394, 395. Trist, Mr. and Mrs., I. 348. Trotter, Hon. Mrs., II 148. Trotti, Marchese and Marchesa, II. 95, 96, 97. Trowbridge, Sir, Thomas, I. 180, 277. Truchsess, II. 41. Tudor, William, Life of James Otis, I. 338 and note. Turin, visits, II. 37-42, 351-353. Turner, Robert, II. 374 Tuscany, Grand Duchess Dowager of, II. 54, 55, 90. Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters