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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 7 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Walter Calverley Trevelyan or search for Walter Calverley Trevelyan in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
on English reform and American slavery, and such exciting topics as necessarily produced lively talk. We sat long at table, and then I carried Dr. Bowring to Mr. Trevelyan's, Since Sir Walter Calverley Trevelyan, Bart. where there was a small party of English, but none so interesting as himself and his wife. January 2, 1837Sir Walter Calverley Trevelyan, Bart. where there was a small party of English, but none so interesting as himself and his wife. January 2, 1837.—. . . . In the evening we went for a short time to the Princess Massimo's. We brought letters to her, but did not deliver them until lately, because they have been in great affliction, on account of the dangerous illness of one of the family. She is a Princess of Saxony, own cousin to the unfortunate Louis XVI., and married to speak of the grandeur of ancient Rome. But we were very kindly and pleasantly received, and passed an hour agreeably. The rest of the evening we spent at Mrs. Trevelyan's. . . . January 9.—A course of lectures, to be delivered thrice a week, was begun this morning at the Archaeological Institute. It is to be delivered by
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
Chapter 20: Letters, 1857-59, to Judge Curtis, Sir Edmund Head, Sir C. Lyell, Mr. R. H. Gardiner. letter from Baron Humboldt. letters to Mr. Everett, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir W. C. Trevelyan. The following letter-which, being chiefly concerned with our national affairs, belongs rather in the present chapter than where its date would have placed it–is addressed to a person whose slight connection with this book is no indication of his position in Mr. Ticknor's esteem. Judge Curtis was regarded by his uncle with an affectionate and faithful interest from his boyhood, and in his maturer years he became the object of a respect, and admiration, which seemed to neutralize the natural effect of their relative ages. The appointment of Mr. Curtis to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of the United States, in 1851, gratified Mr. Ticknor in an extreme degree, while he felt that it was the place for which his nephew was by all the qualities of his mind and character expres
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
received whatever I ever got of political education or principles. Webster seems to have been the last of the Romans; and yet he, too, made mistakes. But I hope you will give a good prominence to his solemn protest in the Senate against the annexation of Texas. It is one of the grandest things he ever did. . . . . But I am interrupted. William Gardiner, Mrs. Cabot, etc., and dinner immediately; in short, nothing before the post, but, Ever yours, and all well, Geo. T. To Sir Walter C. Trevelyan, Bart. Boston, U. S. A., August 31, 1869. my dear Trevelyan,—My silence is not forgetfulness, neither is it ingratitude; it is simply old age. I am past seventy-eight, and, like nearly everybody of that age, I do, not what I like best to do, but what I can. I cannot walk much, and I forget a great deal, and I write as little as I can. Reading is my great resource, and I have lately been much amused with Crabbe Robinson, who is a model for old men, as far as their strength holds