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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Trigg or search for John Trigg in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rged again until the sun went down, and driven it to seek safety with the main body now encamped twelve miles from the scene of his first attack. Shelby then encamped. In this day's fight, foremost in the pursuit, fell mortally wounded second Lieutenant Trigg of my escort, who was sent by me to General Shelby with despatches, and having accomplished that duty, and the fight coming on, joined the advance, and there fought with a valor worthy the emulation of the bravest. Captain Thorpe, of Eished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our galla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
anwhile, Shelby encountering the enemy's rear-guard, consisting of a brigade of infantry, regiment of cavalry, and a battery, had with the gallantry and dash, which ever accompany him and his brigade, charged in line of battle mounted—charged and charged again until the sun went down, and driven it to seek safety with the main body now encamped twelve miles from the scene of his first attack. Shelby then encamped. In this day's fight, foremost in the pursuit, fell mortally wounded second Lieutenant Trigg of my escort, who was sent by me to General Shelby with despatches, and having accomplished that duty, and the fight coming on, joined the advance, and there fought with a valor worthy the emulation of the bravest. Captain Thorpe, of Elliott's battalion, the advance, charged with his company through a regiment of Federal infantry, scattering them to the four winds. He received a severe though not mortal wound in that charge. Placing a sufficient force at Elkin's Ferry to hold
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
attanooga, and moved in pursuance thereof early on the 23d. We reached the Watkins House about 11 o'clock A. M., and proceeded to take up a line around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my junior officers. The steady good conduct throughout the long conflict of the subordinate officers and men which the limits of this report will not permit me to particularize, is worth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
at a very slow rate of speed, and no damage was done. We enjoyed a fine country dinner at a farm house. Sunday, March 9th.—Paris. Attended preaching this morning, land visited the cemetery. There were a few handsome monuments, but the place seemed greatly neglected. On the gate was this inscription, Injure nothing here; it may be thy resting place. After dinner we started to West Sandy to meet our comrades who had been taking down the wire from the river to Big Sandy. John and Will Trigg, Claridge, Ed. Owen, and I were left with the train while the others went on to bring the wire. While they were gone we employed ourselves in getting wood and bailing water for the engine. At nine oa clock we went to supper. The early part of the night was beautiful and the moon was shining brightly, but dark clouds began to gather, and while at supper a heavy rain commenced falling. As we returned to the creek with the engine, we struck the cars a tremendous blow that sent me reeling o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
n, composed of the brigades of Brigadier-General Gracie, and of Colonels Trigg and Kelly, of a battalion of artillery to each division, and a y, about 3 o'clock P. M., sent to his assistance the brigade of Colonel Trigg. The gallant and successful charge of this brigade drove back e enemy's heavy attack. During the day both Stewart's division and Trigg's brigade had penetrated the enemy's line and passed beyond the Charton's, and just in rear of Poe's, commonly called the Burnt House; Trigg's brigade just south of Brotherton's house, and supporting Williamson the heights near Snodgrass's house, sustaining him afterwards by Trigg's brigade, under the able direction of Brigadier-General Preston, timpetuosity assailed the enemy in his almost impregnable position. Trigg, on coming up, was directed to the left of Kelly, and joining in a eston and his brigade commanders, Brigadier-General Gracie, and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, I cannot bestow higher praise than to say, that thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
ynard Rifles. Reports from New Orleans are numerous and conflicting. May 3d.—Our regiment was re-organized to-day. Jimmy Lawrence was elected Captain of the Hickory Rifles; Dr. Butt, First Lieutenant; George Hockton, Second Lieutenant, and John Trigg Third Lieutenant. Dr. Butt was the only one of the old officers reelected. Lawrence, Hockton and Trigg were all elevated from the ranks, on the ground of personal popularity, without regard to qualification for office. But they are all good mTrigg were all elevated from the ranks, on the ground of personal popularity, without regard to qualification for office. But they are all good men, and I hope will prove as efficient with swords as they have been with muskets. It is a dangerous experiment to elect officers in the field, and especially in the face of the enemy. Captain Mellersh was left out for no other reason than that he was a strict disciplinarian. The election of field officers was postponed. Heavy cannonading was heard this morning, which proved to be skirmishing on the right wing of our army between Marmaduke's brigade and the enemy, who are advancing on our