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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 100 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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geon should be abolished, and the officers of that corps be hereafter designated surgeons of volunteers, and in all other respects be put upon the same footing as to rank, pay, and emoluments with the surgeons provided for in the act. That there should be added to each volunteer regiment in the service, an assistant-surgeon, to be appointed according to the existing laws of the several States, providing for the appointment of regimental surgeons. The amendment was agreed to. On motion of Mr. Trimble, of Ohio, the bill was so amended as to provide that the surgeons appointed under this act, should be under forty years of age. The bill was then passed as amended, without a division. On the seventeenth, the Senate concurred in the House amendments, with an amendment striking out the proviso that the surgeon appointed under the act should be under forty years of age. The House concurred in the Senate amendment to the House amendment. On the second of July, the President returned the bi
onel Atkinson, subsequently by Colonel Evans, Trimble's brigade, commanded by Colonel R. F. Hoke, a Ewell'sHays'sCarrington's Battery 11 Ewell'sTrimble's21st North Carolina 2424 Ewell'sTrimble's21st Georgia32427 Ewell'sTrimble's15th Alabama13435 Ewell'sTrimble's12th Georgia41620 Ewell'sEarlyTrimble's12th Georgia41620 Ewell'sEarly's13th Virginia31922 Ewell'sEarly's25th Virginia11314 Ewell'sEarly's31st Virginia21416 Ewell'sEarected Colonel Hoke to move with his brigade (Trimble's) to the left of Hays's, on the same line; bl Hoke, commanding brigade. headquarters Trimble's brigade, December 19, 1862. Major S. Hale, etween the brigades of General Paxton and General Trimble, then commanded by Colonel Hoke. The Seveing ordered to join Colonel Hoke, commanding Trimble's brigade, he placed his regiment in a trenchsed my flank, and Colonel Hoke, in command of Trimble's brigade, came down. to the edge of the woon arm; Wm. T. Baily, slightly in shoulder; James Trimble, slightly in knee. Company L.--Wounded:[2 more...]
duty he was engaged all night. At early dawn Trimble's division composed the second line, and RodeSeeing this danger, I sent Mr. Grogan, of General Trimble's staff, to order Paxton's brigade to movthat much of the credit due to the prowess of Trimble's division has been attributed to others. Thrt, and to guard the flank. By five o'clock, Trimble's division, under command of Brigadier-Generaorps, Trimble's, 33 Tenth Virginia,Colston's,Trimble's,23101124 Twenty-third Virginia,Colston's,Timble's,85866 Fourth Virginia,E. F. Paxton's,Trimble's,14149163 Fifth Virginia,E. F. Paxton's,TriTrimble's,7113120 Twenty-seventh Virginia,E. F. Paxton's,Trimble's,96271 Thirty-third Virginia,E. F.ble's,82735 Second Louisiana,F. T. Nicholls'sTrimble's,1590105 Tenth Louisiana,F. T. Nicholls'sTr, Trimble's, 11 Twenty-first Virginia,Jones'sTrimble's,44044 Forty-second Virginia,Jones'sTrimbleTrimble's,15120135 Forty-fourth VirginiaJones'sTrimble's,185871 Forty-eighth Virginia,Jones'sTrimble's,1[26 more...]<
t of crossing at Russell's Ford. Colonel Carter (First Tennessee) was sent at double-quick to cut them off, which he did in most gallant style. Being cut off from the ford, the enemy took a strong position on the opposite side of Big Creek, where they had been encamped. Leaving one section of Phillips' battery, supported by three companies of the Second East Tennessee mounted infantry at Russell House, three hundred yards in front of their position, and on this side of Big Creek, Lieutenant-Colonel Trimble (Tenth Kentucky) and Major Parker (Fourth Kentucky) were brought forward and dismounted in five hundred and fifty yards of this section, and moved up. The men all went forward with the greatest enthusiasm, making no halt for balls, shells, or bullets. Colonel Carter, after intercepting their retreat by the ford, turned upon these two guns, and, advancing by a shorter route, was the first to reach them, capturing, at the same time, a large number of wagons, which had moved out to c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
ry direction with orders to meet this new movement, but Jackson coolly replied: 1 am very much obliged to you, sir, for the information you have given me, but General Trimble will attend to them. I expected this movement, and ordered Trimble posted there to meet it. He rode off, seemingly as unconcerned as if nothing had happenTrimble posted there to meet it. He rode off, seemingly as unconcerned as if nothing had happened. Trimble did attend to them, and after a severe fight drove them back. General Lee was prevented by a sudden rise of the river from a severe storm from crossing at Warrenton White Sulphur Springs, but the next day Jackson forded the river higher up, and made his famous movement to Pope's flank and rear. Other IilustrationTrimble did attend to them, and after a severe fight drove them back. General Lee was prevented by a sudden rise of the river from a severe storm from crossing at Warrenton White Sulphur Springs, but the next day Jackson forded the river higher up, and made his famous movement to Pope's flank and rear. Other Iilustrations. I have noted other illustrations of this point, but I find I am in danger of making this paper too long, and must omit much that I might say. Fifth. Jackson was noted for the quickness of his decisions, and his short orders on the battlefield. At Winchester on the Valley campaign he said to Colonel Patton, who commande
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
Federals, under General McClellan, who had again resumed command of the Army of the Potomac. The conflict on our part of the field began about sunrise, and soon raged fiercely in our immediate front. The word came that the brigades of Lawton, Trimble, and Hays were being hard pressed, and Hood's Division, composed of an Alabama Brigade, under Law, and the Texas Brigade, under Colonel Wofford, of the 18th Georgia, were ordered forward. When the troops emerged from the timber and passed the o the whole of Hooker's Corps was there. As we occupied a position on the hill, and above the Confederate line in front, the fire of the enemy played havoc in the ranks of the supporting column. In vain did the officers in charge of Hays' and Trimble's Brigades urge them to charge, and in vain did the Texas Brigade add its entreaties to theirs. The line would neither advance nor retreat; its ranks were decimated, and its fire was ineffective. Suddenly, as if moved by a single impulse, the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
Perkins, J. W. Parmetier, Alexander Rossell, John Rice, died in Camp Douglas, April 12, 1864, of smallpox; Thomas Rice, Dr. Aylett Raines, promoted to assistant surgeon, 1862; Tillman Shanks, Wesley Smithheart, John Shearer, Joseph P. Simmons, orderly to Colonel Chenault; Ira W. Scudder, commissary sergeant; Sidney Shaw, Harrison Shaw, James Shearer, Anderson Terrill, died in Camp Douglas, March 10, 1864, of smallpox; Reuben Turner, Robert Turner, James Turner, Wm. Turner, John Turner, James Trimble, Robert Trevis, Valentine Tillett, Jacob White, James Wade, Richard Williams, Hiram Wood, Ezekiel Walcott, James Wilson, died in Camp Douglas, February 18, 1864, of old sores.—91 officers and enlisted men. Company C. Company C was recruited in Clark County, and most of its members enlisted in one day—Saturday, September 6, 1862. The following is a copy of the only official roll of the company known to be in existence, and this is supposed to be 15 or 20 names short: Captain—And<
ed an impudent "Proclamation" to the people of Breathiest county, Ky., telling the rebels they are fighting without cause, and promising them if they come back they shall not be punished for "past offences or for opinion's sake, " if they remain loyal hereafter He further promises a reward of $100 to any man that will tell him of any right he ever had that the Lincoln Government has taken from him — all of which promises he intends to keep — in a horn! Some days since Green Trimble, James Trimble, William Trimble, David S. Trimble, and several other wealthy and influential men residing in and near Hazel Green, Kentucky, were arrested for treason and brought before Commissioner R. Appleton, at Mt. Sterling, for trial. All the accused were discharged by the Commissioner excepting David S. Trimble, who was held to answer to the charge of treason in the United States Court at Frankfort next May.--His case was brought before Judge Ballard in Louisville, a few days ago. After hearing