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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 78 4 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 10 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 45 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 23 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 22 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Trimble or search for Trimble in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ers to the right and front, it remained in this position until morning, it being then about 10 o'clock. Early next morning the brigade was placed on the right of the artillery. A line of skirmishers under command of Lieutenant A. J. Brown was thrown out, and was held against several strong attacks. The Scales brigade joined the division on the left again, and was joined on to Lane's brigade. On the morning of July 3d, Scales' brigade was ordered to the right and placed in command of General Trimble, and while here suffered greatly from the artillery fire. The regiment was then ordered forward over a crimson plain. The Federal lines, as the regiment emerged from the woods, were about a mile in front. The troops were compelled to cross a fence, and were by this time losing heavily from grape and canister. The line was somewhat deranged. Captain Thornburg was disabled. About 150 yards from the enemy's line another fence retarded the advance, but the troops rushed on and reached
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
been for ten years his colleague in the faculty of the Virginia Military Institute, and knew him well, General Colston was assigned to the command of a brigade in Trimble's division, of Jackson's corps. At Chancellorsville, at 6 o'clock P. M., May 2, 1863, the hour when Stonewall Jackson ordered his corps of 26,000 men to disclose their presence in rear of the right flank of General Hooker's grand army, Jackson's command was formed, with Rodes' division in front, Trimble's division under Colston (Trimble being disabled), in the second line two yards in the rear, and A. P. Hill's division in supporting distance in column. At the word, the men burst with aTrimble being disabled), in the second line two yards in the rear, and A. P. Hill's division in supporting distance in column. At the word, the men burst with a cheer upon the startled enemy, and like a disciplined thunderbolt, swept down his line and captured cannon before they could be reversed to fire. Rodes, who led with so much spirit, said, that the enemy taken in flank and rear, did not wait for an attack. Colston's division followed so rapidly, that it went over the enemy's work