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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for De la Trinite or search for De la Trinite in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
n a member of the Chamber of Deputies in 1848-49, and 1871, and afterwards a senator for life. In 1839, he became a law professor in the Conservatory of the Arts and Trades; and in 1855 was admitted to the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences. He founded the first Credit foncier of Paris, which became the Credit fancier of France. His funeral on Aug. 18, 1876, though simple in rites, was imposing in the attendance of distinguished men. The religious services were held at the Église de la Trinite, and a discourse was pronounced at Pere La Chaise on behalf of the Academy. Journal des Debats, Aug. 19, 1876. London Times, Aug. 17, 1876. was the editor of the Revue de Legislation et de Jurisprudence; of Polish birth, and an exile, he had become a French citizen. Political economy rather than jurisprudence was to give him his fame. In time of birth he differed from Sumner less than a year. Each began his career as the editor of a law magazine, and each ended it as a senator. Sumne
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
h M. Demetz, on May 26, 1857. He was much touched by a remark of the philanthropist, made in the conversation, that he had renounced his position as judge, thinking that there was something more for him to do than to continue rendering judgments of courts (faisant des arrests;) that he had the happiness of being a Christian, and that it was of much more importance to him what the good God should think of him than what men thought. Funeral services were celebrated in Paris in the Église de la Trinite, at Dourdan, the place of his burial, and at Mettray, where he directed his heart to be deposited. On May 3, 1874, the busts of Demetz and his colaborer, Courteilles, were inaugurated at Mettray, with an address from M. Drouyn de Lhuys. a Conseiller de la Cour Royale, —namely, a magistrate or judge. At a quarter before eleven o'clock I found myself with him. He is a man of about forty, who has visited the United States and written a book about the country; and yet he does not venture t