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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 3 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Capital, National (search)
believed that it would have been carried but for the opposition of the Southern men to Philadelphia. In more recent years there have been agitations favoring removal to St. Louis or some other Western city, on the ground of having it in a more central location geographically. In 1816 Congress, by joint resolution, authorized the President of the United States to procure, for the ornamenting of the new Capitol, then building, four large paintings of Revolutionary scenes from the hand of John Trumbull, a worthy pupil of Benjamin West. He possessed a large number of portraits of the prominent actors in the events of the Revolution, painted by himself, and these he used in his compositions. These pictures are now in the rotunda of the Capitol, under the magnificent dome, and are of peculiar historic value, as they perpetuate correct likenesses of the men whom Americans delight to honor. These paintings represent the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, the Surrender of Burgoy
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunt, Isaac 1751-1809 (search)
Hunt, Isaac 1751-1809 Author; born in Barbadoes, W. I., in 1751; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1763; admitted to the bar in 1765. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was a strong royalist, and wrote leaflets which led to his imprisonment, but later he escaped and went to England, where he became a clergyman. His publications include The political family, or a discourse pointing out the reciprocal advantages which flow from an uninterrupted Union between Great Britain and her American colonies; Right of Englishmen, an antidote to the poison of Thomas Paine; Autobiography of John Trumbull, etc. He died in London, in 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McFingal, (search)
McFingal, The title of a, political and historical satire, in four cantos, written by John Trumbull during the American Revolution. McFingal is a representative of the Tory or loyalist party in that struggle, a burly New England squire, constantly engaged with Honorius, a champion of the Whigs, or rebels, as the British called the patriots. In it all the leading Tories of the day are severely lampooned. It is written in Hudibrastic style, and is the ablest American production of the kind. The first canto was published in 1775; the whole work in 1782. An edition, fully annotated by Benson J. Lossing, was published in 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Smyrna colony. (search)
New Smyrna colony. In 1767 Dr. Trumbull, of Charleston, S. C., went to the place known as New Smyrna, in Florida, with about 1,500 persons— Greeks, Italians, and Minorcans—whom he had persuaded to follow him to better their fortunes. He established them on a tract of 60.000 acres, and began the cultivation of indigo. TrumTrumbull reduced these poor people to slavery, and treated them most cruelly. The English governor of the territory was his partner in the enterprise. He kept the colonists in subjection by troops. This slavery lasted nine years, when, in 1776, the petitions of the people were heard and heeded by a new governor just arrived, and n, in 1776, the petitions of the people were heard and heeded by a new governor just arrived, and they were released from the tyranny of Trumbull. Nearly two-thirds of the colonists had then perished. Most of the survivors went to St. Augustine, where their descendants constituted a considerable portion of the native populat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York City (search)
n. Washington suspected New York was his destination, where Governor Tryon was sowing the seeds of disaffection from his seat of government on board the Duchess of Gordon in the harbor. The committee of safety and the provincial convention of New York were strongly tinctured with Toryism. General Lee, then in Connecticut, had heard of disaffection there and asked permission of Washington to raise volunteers to go there and suppress it. The privilege was granted, and, with the aid of Governor Trumbull, he embodied about 1,200 volunteers and pressed on towards New York, with the bold King Sears as his adjutant-general. His approach (February, 1776) produced great alarm. Many Tories fled with their families to Long Island and New Jersey; and the timid committee of safety protested against his entering the city, for the captain of the Asia had declared that if rebel troops were permitted to enter the town, he would cannonade and burn it. Lee pressed forward and encamped in the Fiel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential administrations. (search)
Presidential administrations. The Presidents and leading cabinet officers, with the political complexion of both the executive and legislative departments of the national government, have been as follows: 1789-93: Washington; Adams, Vice-President, Federalist; Jefferson, State; Hamilton, Treasury; Knox, War; Edmund Randolph, Attorney-General. Congress, Federalist; Muhlenberg and Trumbull speakers. 1793-97: Washington and Adams again; Jefferson, then Randolph, State; Hamilton, then Wolcott, Treasury; other minor changes. Congress, 1793-95, Republican House; Muhlenberg, speaker; 1795-97, Dayton, speaker. 1797-1801: Adams, Federalist; Jefferson, Vice-President, Republican; Pickering, State; Wolcott, Treasury. Congress, Federalist; Dayton and Sedgwick, speakers. 1801-5: Jefferson; Burr, Vice-Presi- dent, Republican; Madison, State; Gallatin, Treasury. Congress, Republican; Macon, speaker. 1805-9: Jefferson; George Clinton, Vice-President, Republican; Madison, State;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Romans, Bernard 1720- (search)
Romans, Bernard 1720- Engineer; born in Holland about 1720; was employed as an engineer in America by the British government, some time before the Revolution. While in government employ as a botanist, in New York, and engaged in the publication of a Natural history of Florida, the committee of safety of that city offered him the position of military engineer. He accepted the service, and was afterwards employed by Congress to fortify the Highlands east of West Point. At or near the close of the war he was captured at sea, on his way to Charleston, taken to England, and in 1784 embarked for America. It is supposed he was murdered on the passage. He published a Map of the seat of Civil War in America, 1775; also Annals of the troubles in the Netherlands, from the accession of Charles V., which was dedicated to Governor Trumbull.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, John 1750-1843 (search)
Trumbull, John 1750-1843 Poet; born in Westbury (since Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750; graduated at Yale College in 1767, having been admitted to the collegn America. This famous poem has passed through many editions. After the war, Trumbull, with Humphreys, Barlow, and Lemuel Hopkins, wrote a series of poetic essays ehe spirit of anarchy then prevailing in the feeble Union. From 1789 to 1795 Mr. Trumbull was State attorney for Hartford; and in 1792 and 1800 he was a member of theas secretary to Jay's mission to London, and was appointed a commissioner John Trumbull. (1796) to carry the treaty into execution. He returned to the United Stating the Academy of Fine Arts there, of which he was president in 1816– 25. Mr. Trumbull painted a large number of pictures of events in American history. In consideration of receiving from Yale College $1,000 a year during his life, Colonel Trumbull presented to that institution fifty-seven of his pictures, which form the Trumb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ppropriates $1,000,000 a year for eight years to increase the navy......April 29, 1816 First session adjourns......April 30, 1816 Presidential election held......Nov. 12, 1816 Second session convenes......Dec. 2, 1816 Indiana admitted into the Union (the nineteenth State)......Dec. 11, 1816 American Colonization Society formed in Washington, D. C.......December, 1816 United States Bank begins operations......January, 1817 Congress authorizes the President to employ John Trumbull, of Connecticut, to paint four scenes of the Revolution for the Capitol......Feb. 6, 1817 [These paintings are The Declaration of Independence; Surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga; Surrender of Cornwallis; and the Resignation of Washington at Annapolis.] Electoral vote counted......Feb. 12, 1817 Act dividing the Mississippi territory......March 1, 1817 Fourteenth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1817 eighth administration—Democraticrepublican, March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1821.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
ed and championed by an Anglican minister. For his boldness, however, his parishioners drove him into exile, in common with many another clergyman who held similar views. Mention should also be made here of the poems of Philip Freneau and John Trumbull, although the fuller discussion of their literary significance belongs elsewhere in this work. Book I, Chap. IX. The first of Freneau's poems of the Revolution, On the Conqueror of America shut up in Boston and General Gage's Soliloquy, were published in the summer of 1775, while the siege of Boston was in progress. Trumbull, whose muse had already responded to some of the earlier incidents of the war, published the first canto of McFingal in January, 1776. Grounded, as were the writings of both of these authors, in a clear, popular understanding of the points at issue, and foreshadowing, in Freneau's case, the ultimate attainment of independence, the satirical humour of the poems confirmed the faithful and strengthened the wa
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