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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. H. Trumbull or search for J. H. Trumbull in all documents.

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e whole country. I believe the Senate is influenced by considerations which do not touch the interests of the whole country, and to some extent influenced by passion and resentment. I believe this war is prosecuted according to the purposes of the majority of those who are managing the legislation of the country for the purposes of subjugation, and I believe it is useless for those who wish for peace to talk to the majority here. He might as well talk to the winds. He then referred to Mr. Trumbull's amendment in regard to freeing slaves in case of being found aiding treason, and contended that it was in effect a general act of emancipation. I contend that this war is not to maintain the Constitution. On the contrary, the Constitution has been trampled under foot by the proceedings of the President. I have under-taken to show that the Constitution has been deliberately, frequently, and flagrantly violated in the course of this war. We have heard violent and denunciatory speeches
Doc. 131.-remarks of Messrs. Trumbull and Carlile on the bill to suppress insurrection, in the United States Senate, July 30. Mr. Trumbull said: The object of this bill is to confer certain powers on the military authorities in cases of insurrection and rebellion, and to regulate, as far as practicable, by law, the exercise of such powers; to provide for putting down this rebellion in a constitutional and legal manner. The rebellion having arisen during the recess of Congress, imposed on Mr. Trumbull said: The object of this bill is to confer certain powers on the military authorities in cases of insurrection and rebellion, and to regulate, as far as practicable, by law, the exercise of such powers; to provide for putting down this rebellion in a constitutional and legal manner. The rebellion having arisen during the recess of Congress, imposed on the President, who is sworn to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution, and whose duty it is to see that the laws are faithfully executed, the necessity of exerting his whole constitutional power to preserve the Constitution from overthrow and the Government from destruction. It may be that in the exercise of this high duty the President has assumed authority and done acts which no positive law directly authorized, but whatever he has done which was necessary to preserve the Constitution
mperature of the place. He was inclined to think that necessities of a case give a military commander all the power needed. Mr. Breckinridge (Ky.) said he should vote for its postponement. He was glad to see the Senate at last pause before one bill. Hie wished it were published in every newspaper in the country. He thought it would meet with universal condemnation. He thought this would abolish all State Government and destroy the last vestige of political and personal liberty. Mr. Trumbull, of Illinois, contended that some bill of the kind was necessary from the exigencies of the times. The Constitution is in danger, and we have voted men and money to carry on the war to save the Constitution, and how can we justify ourselves without maturing a bill so much needed? Give the bill the goby, and let the Constitution be violated every day because we would not pass it, but leave the military to do as they please without restriction. Mr. Breckinridge (Ky.) said the drama was
Doc. 187.-Governor Buckingham's call. For the purpose of sustaining the supremacy of the Federal Government, and suppressing the rebellion now raging against its authority, I, William A. Buckingham, Governor of the State of Connecticut, hereby call upon the loyal and patriotic citizens of this State to organize in companies for four regiments of infantry, and offer their services for three years or during the war. The several companies will report to the Adjutant-General, and when accepted will be required to rendezvous with the regiments to which they shall be attached by the Commander-in-Chief. Two regiments will rendezvous at New Haven and two at Hartford. Given under my hand and seal of the State, at Hartford, this the 15th day of August, 1861. Wm. A. Buckingham. By his Excellency's command, J. H. Trumbull, Secretary of State.