hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for William T. Truxton or search for William T. Truxton in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
no matter how clever, does not stand much chance of success against the enemy unless he is well supported by his officers; and as Dupont up to this time had been everywhere successful, we must give a portion of the credit to those who served under his command. That Dupont was fortunate in his selection, the names of Captain C. H. Davis, Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Parrott, Steedman, Gillis, Prentiss, Lieutenants-Commanding Balch, Stevens, Ammen, Nicholson, Truxton, Rhind, Bankhead, Conroy,Watmough, Budd, Semmes and Phoenix, in command of vessels,will show, besides the junior officers mentioned favorably by their commanding officers. Nearly all the commanding officers reached high rank, and the youngest of them are now well up on the list of commodores and captains. Eleven of them attained the rank of rear-admiral; and of these six are still living, have retired from active duty, and are reaping the reward of faithful service. They will figur
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
the Seneca and Ellen at Seabrook. The work was performed in very narrow and crooked rivers, but with care and skillful handling the gunboats (though often aground) were brought out with but little damage. The reports of Lieuts.-Commanding Truxton and Nicholson, though not containing an account of severe service, are instructive as showing how each officer of the fleet was kept employed in chasing up the enemy, and how the latter kept on the move. Admiral Dupont made it a rule (and it one. The officers and boats' crews were in continual danger from the fire of bush-whacking Confederates, who were always ready for a fight. The names of Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Rhind, Stevens, Balch, Ammen, Truxton, Watmough, and Semmes, were conspicuous wherever a Confederate shot was heard, or wherever there was a chance to gain a point on the enemy. Heavy knocks were received by our gunboats from Confederate flying batteries, which would often make d
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
and, Wm. Deaver and C. W. Kenyon; Boatswain, J. H. Polly; Gunner, William Hardison. Steamer Penobscot. Lieutenant-Commander, J. E. de Haven; Assistant Surgeon, Edw. A. Pierson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Addison Poole; Acting-Master, Charles E. Jack; Acting-Ensigns, S. K. Luce and H. D. Edwards; Acting-Master's Mate, G. H. Smith; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Geo. W. Cobb; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. M. Rodes, Wm. C. Burrett and G. W. Hall. Steamer Chocura. Lieutenant-Commander, Wm. T. Truxton; Lieutenant, John McFarland; Assistant Surgeon, Chas. Carter; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. L. Turner; Acting-Masters, P. S. Borden and T. B. Sears; Acting-Master's Mates, D M. Carver, Wm. Leonard and A. P. Atwood; Engineers: Second-Assistant, Zeph. Talbot; Third-Assistants, Andrew Blythe, Theodore Cooper and Wm. H. Harrison. Steamer Monticello. Lieutenant-Commander, D. L. Braine; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Gale; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. de F. Barton; Acting-M
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
avery and untiring zeal. I can draw no distinction between the following officers, whom I recommend for promotion. They were under fire most all the time, and at close quarters, and coolly performed what was required of them: Lieutenant-Commander W. T. Truxton, commanding the Tacony; Lieutenant-Commander P. G. Watmough, commanding the Kansas; Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsay, commanding the Unadilla; Lieutenant-Commander D. L. Braine, commanding the Pequot; Lieutenant-Commander Ralph Cha as soon as the Monticello hove in sight, leaving everything in this heavy and beautiful fortification uninjured, and only two 9-inch guns spiked in the work at Deep River Point. Up to January 20th, only one gun-boat, the Tacony, Lieutenant-Commander W. T. Truxton, had succeeded after hard work in getting past the Rip, a bad shoal which barred the way, after passing Fort Buchanan, to the fair channel of Cape Fear River. The Admiral at once sent her to Reeves' Point, about three miles above F