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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
. Seward, Secretary of State, was incited, concocted and procured by and between Jeff. Davis, late of Richmond, Virginia; and Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverley Tucker, George N. Sanders, W. W. Cleary, and other rebels and traitors against the government of the United States, harbored in Canada. Now, therefore, to the end trrest of Jacob Thompson, late of Mississippi; twenty-five thousand dollars for the arrest of George N. Sanders; twenty-five thousand dollars for the arrest of Beverley Tucker; ten thousand dollars for the arrest of W. W. Cleary, late clerk of C. C. Clay. The Provost-Marshall-General of the United States is directed to cause a dect the connecting of Mr. Davis and Mr. Thompson with the assassination. Each, all, and every one of his statements as to Mr. Clement C. Clay, Mr. Saunders, Mr. Beverley Tucker and myself, are shown to be equally false and mendacious. Conover mentions, in his secret examination, the names of other gentlemen as his intimate assoc
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. Carl Van Doren The services of the historical romance in the development of the American novel. the influence of the frontier. the sections celebrated by the romancers. John Neal. Mrs. Child. Miss Sedgwick. D. P. Thompson. Paulding. Bird. Kennedy. Judge Beverley Tucker. Caruthers. William Gilmore Simms. his devotion to South Carolina. the variety of his miscellaneous work. Guy Rivers. the Yemassee. the partisan series. Simms's border tales. his tragic later career. Mrs. Kirkland. James Hall. Kentucky in fiction. Bird's Mexican romances. Mayo. Melville. Typee. Omoo. Mardi. Moby Dick. Ware. Judd. the victory of fiction in the United States It is mere coincidence that Cooper was born in the year which produced The power of sympathy and that when he died Uncle Tom's Cabin was passing through its serial stage, and yet the limits of his life mark almost exactly the first great period of American
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ley of Virginia and brought up in Richmond, cherished a passion as intense as Simms's for his native state and deliberately set out to celebrate its past and its beauty. Leather Stocking and Silk (1854) and The last of the Foresters (1856), both narratives of life in the Valley, recall Cooper by more than their titles; but in The youth of Jefferson (1854), still more in The Virginia comedians (1854) and its sequel Henry St. John, Gentleman (1859), Cooke seems as completely Virginian as Beverley Tucker See Book II, Chap. VII. before him, though less stately in his tread. All three of these novels have their scenes laid in Williamsburg, the old capital of the Dominion; they reproduce a society strangely made up of luxury, daintiness, elegance, penury, ugliness, brutality. At times the dialogue of Cooke's impetuous cavaliers and merry girls nearly catches the flavour of the Forest of Arden, but there is generally something stilted in their speech or behaviour that spoils the gay i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 114, 321, 322, 324, 437 Tribune Primer, the, 27 Trinity College (S. C.), 305 Trip to Chinatown, a, 279, 513 Troilus and Cressida, 482 Trowbridge, J. T., 306, 352 True civilization, 437 True Constitution of government in the sovereignty of the individual, the, 437 True interest of the United States . . . considered, the, 429 Truman, B. C., 352 Trumbull, 539, 542 Truth, the, 283, 284 Truth advanced, 535 Truth and fiction, 598 Tubingen (University), 468 Tucker, Beverley, 67 Tucker, George, 434, 438 Tucker, St. George, 495 Tucker, W. J., 215 Tuckerman, H. T., 18, 487 Tuckerman, Joseph, 215 Tulane University, 598 Tully, R. W., 281 Turgenev, 81, 105 Turgot, 430 Turner, F. J., 52 Turnermarsch, 581 Turn of the Screw, the, 104 Twenty Sermons, 218 n. Twin Beds, 295 Twining, W. J., 153 Two Brothers, the, 507, 509 Two lectures on political economy, 434 Two little girls in Blue, 513 Two orphans, the, 271 Two
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
son Davis, Clement C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, George N. Sanders, Beverley Tucker, and W. C. Cleary, incited and concerted the assassination of arrest of Davis, Clay, and Thompson $100,000 each; for Sanders and Tucker, $25,000 each; and for Cleary, $10,000. Publish this in hand-bills, of J. Wilkes Booth. Among those thus charged was my uncle, Mr. Beverley Tucker. He was as innocent as a newborn babe, and utterly incapablng it, asked: Who is there? I was answered by the question: Does Dr. Tucker live here? Replying again to me, our midnight visitor said, in aith chilling coldness, he had orders to search the house for Mr. Beverley Tucker. When told that he was not in the house, and had not been ten dawned on us what it all meant, and we told the man it was not Mr. Tucker who had been with us, but his son, who had his father's name. Wh or what he wanted. Just as he asked, in the kindliest tones, if Dr. Tucker lived there, my little sister, a flaxen-haired girl, appeared in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
neral Upton: The President of the United States has issued his proclamation announcing that the Bureau of Military Justice has reported, upon indisputable evidence, that Jefferson Davis, Clement C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, George N. Sanders, Beverley Tucker, and W. C. Cleary, incited and concerted the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, offers for the arrest of Davis, Clay, and Thompson $100,000 each; for Sanders and Tucker, $25,000 each;Tucker, $25,000 each; and for Cleary, $10,000. Publish this in hand-bills, circulate everywhere, and urge the greatest possible activity in the pursuit. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the next day the same headquarters informs General McCook of these rewards—adding that a reward of $10,000 was also offered for Extra Billy Smith, Rebel Governor of Virginia. (104 War of the Rebellion, 683 ) This reward was subsequently increased to $25,000. A very moderate sum for so gallant a gentleman. General Wilson also w<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
osed to have been accomplices of J. Wilkes Booth. Among those thus charged was my uncle, Mr. Beverley Tucker. He was as innocent as a newborn babe, and utterly incapable, by nature, of having had ahe basement window, and opening it, asked: Who is there? I was answered by the question: Does Dr. Tucker live here? Replying again to me, our midnight visitor said, in a very commanding way: Well, Iter-grain—appeared, saying, with chilling coldness, he had orders to search the house for Mr. Beverley Tucker. When told that he was not in the house, and had not been there, the man simply told us ad heard him spoken to. It then dawned on us what it all meant, and we told the man it was not Mr. Tucker who had been with us, but his son, who had his father's name. Whether he believed us or not, id not know either who it was or what he wanted. Just as he asked, in the kindliest tones, if Dr. Tucker lived there, my little sister, a flaxen-haired girl, appeared in the hall, and, with a smile o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
280. Sherry, Sergeant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor Robert L., 361. Toney, Marcus B., 193 Toombs, General Robert 346. Torpedo boats, David, 292, Holland, of C. S. Navy, 293. Thomas, L. B., 223. Tucker, Beverley, 160; Rev. Dallas, 153. Virginia, Advisory Council of War in 1861, 364; Officers of 1st Regiment infantry, 364; 26th Infantry, company G, Roll of, 210; how she supplied Maryland with arms, 163. Wallace, Charles Montriou, 366. War 1861-5, how conducted by the Federals, 101; unrestricted license to burn and plunder, 111; private property destroyed by, 123; spoils, how divided. 114; order of General Lee at Chambersburn, 119; London Times on the, 121; Sewards bell, 122; conduct of Con